Health/Fitness/Diet Propaganda

werewolf

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...

Which leads me to my next rant. Any man serious about their health should either learn to cook or find a good woman that can. Seeing how many of the women I know can't cook worth a damn (80's baby generation), I'd advise young men learn that skill themselves. It's helped me alot.


Me too. I like cooking. And when I cook I get to eat what I like!
 

werewolf

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I think they are less active, but also agree as I've posted in this and other threads that eating habits and the crap "food" most Americans eat is also responsible.

It's only recently, in a society turned into a surveillance/police state by in great part preying on the insecurities and malleability of mothers, that kids no longer play like they always used to. Young children walking to a store, or going anywhere in their neighborhood to play with friends, or riding bicycles all over the place, is much less common than it used to be now that many Americans have been conditioned to believe the country is filled with child abductors, Arab terrorists, school shooters and other lurking, omnipresent dangers. And there is the very real danger of underclass predators.

I used to get up well before dawn to deliver the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette by bicycle to 40 customers spread over a five-mile route. Parents would be arrested for child endangerment if they allowed something like that today.

When the country was mostly rural, kids were lean and strong due to outdoor work and outdoor play. Later, in the suburban era, kids still played a lot outdoors in activities that weren't supervised by adults. Now, organized outdoor sports is about the only avenue left, and it takes motivation by both the child and his parents to pursue that, and given the huge number of broken families and parents with Idiocracy mentalities, many more kids are couch potatoes than before. Modern technology in the form of almost virtual reality video games is another very strong lure to the sedentary, food-stuffing life.


There ya go!
 

werewolf

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DixieDestroyer

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The way we were.

Home movie, Britton, South Dakota, 1938.

Not a People of Walmart monstrosity or black mugger or transvestite or Talmudist or Mohammedan or Mexican bandito or fat slob or face tattooed freak amongst them - and the girls didn't try to look and act like men and vice versa - and poor as they were, in the depths of the depression, they all look well dressed and happy and friendly.

https://archive.org/details/sIvanBes1938_2

Wonderful scenes from the real America...1.0. :)
 

werewolf

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Wonderful scenes from the real America...1.0. :)


Before they trashed the joint. Before we were ordered to "celebrate diversity".

America, what we have lost. There is another great movie called "Russia, what we have lost", 1992.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0201897/

Unfortunately, as far as I know, it has never been translated into English. It shows what the Judeo-Bolsheviks did to that great country, and it was the first public venue in Russia to reveal that Lenin was Jewish and spoke Yiddish at home. That was kept top secret in the USSR. And now the homicidal maniacs in Washington-Aviv are turning on their propaganda machine to hate the great white nation of Russia.

Prior to 1917 Russia had the fastest growing economy in Europe (just as Iraq had the fastest growing economy in the Arab world before they trashed it).

Here is a gorgeous film made in Moscow in 1908 called "Moscow Clad In Snow"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yxNVqP6JW6M
 
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werewolf

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Van Damme says the prophet Muhammed knows best:




I'm no stinking Mohamedan but I eat like he's saying, just a little bit of meat/fish/chicken, with plenty of grains and vegetables. That was the traditional European way of eating too, the grains varying by region, like wheat noodles and bread, rye, barley, buckwheat...rice came to Europe later...Back in the ice age, back in the Pleistocene, we ate a lot of meat back then. A lot of it was really great, all fresh and natural with no additives of course. Some of my favorites were ground sloth and those giant deer we used to have. There were lots of animals back then in the good old days and you need to eat meat to stay warm.
 
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Ambrose

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I'm no stinking Mohamedan but I eat like he's saying, just a little bit of meat/fish/chicken, with plenty of grains and vegetables. That was the traditional European way of eating too, the grains varying by region, like wheat noodles and bread, rye, barley, buckwheat...rice came to Europe later...Back in the ice age, back in the Pleistocene, we ate a lot of meat back then. A lot of it was really great, all fresh and natural with no additives of course. Some of my favorites were ground sloth and those giant deer we used to have. There were lots of animals back then in the good old days and you need to eat meat to stay warm.

I posted it not for the advice on eating but to show Van Damme deems the Koran an admirable source of knowledge and the alleged speaker "Muhammed" worthy of praise. Perhaps he thinks he has some Muslim "friends". In light of everything I know of the Koran, I would say the entire world would be better off disposing of the work, rejecting its consul, and start thinking anew on how to conduct their worldly affairs.

As to eating, yes, the Mediterranean style diet is good practice, and I do mostly, depending on where I am. In the past meat was eaten much less simply because storage and preservation methods were not developed to the extent at which they are today; and, animals were a storage of wealth, so, by eating them too frequently, one's wealth would be diminished. Expressing the obvious made the alleged speaker "Muhammed" a "very smart man" to Van Damme.:frown:

I am surprised to read that you eat very little meat and fish, and eat mostly vegetables and legumes, I would think a wolf needed to eat meat near daily?:)
 

celticdb15

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Anyone here have advice for a ganglion cyst? I've got one on the back of my wrist. Not painful. They say surgery is only 50%effective.
 

celticdb15

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Just live with it in my opinion. Don't let yourself be cut over something like this.

Thank you sir For the response. I believe I will do just that.
 

Don Wassall

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Have you gone to a doctor to have it looked at and get recommendations? I had a sebaceous cyst on my head that I had removed 14 years ago. Gave me local anesthesia and it took about 45 minutes to do the procedure as it was pressed against my skull. It was big, about the size of a grape, but covered by my hair so it couldn't be seen, but could definitely be felt. If yours is large enough to be noticeable you might want to check your options. Just looking now I found this:

Treatment can often be non-surgical. In many cases, these cysts can simply be observed, especially if they are painless, as they frequently disappear spontaneously. If the cyst becomes painful, limits activity, or is otherwise unacceptable, several treatment options are available. The use of splints and anti-inflammatory medication can be prescribed in order to decrease pain associated with activities. An aspiration can be performed to remove the fluid from the cyst and decompress it. This requires placing a needle into the cyst, which can be performed in most office settings. Aspiration is a very simple procedure, but recurrence of the cyst is common. If non-surgical options fail to provide relief or if the cyst recurs, surgical alternatives are available. Surgery involves removing the cyst along with a portion of the joint capsule or tendon sheath (see Figure 3). In the case of wrist ganglion cysts, both traditional open and arthroscopic techniques usually yield good results. Surgical treatment is generally successful although cysts may recur. Your surgeon will discuss the best treatment options for you.
 

celticdb15

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Thanks for the response Don, I figure I'll go get it checked out to be on the safe side. My insurance should cover most of the visit, aspiration could be an option just trying to avoid that expensive MRI bill unless it's necessary.
 

celticdb15

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Well my wrist has been A okay. Had boss man order me a wrist brace and it hasn't swelled up since. I've also been doing a 100 knuckle pushups a day in my down time at work. So far seeing good results already notice uptick in strength and slimming down. What does everybody else do these days to stay in shape?! Figured this thread could use a bump.
 

DixieDestroyer

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Well my wrist has been A okay. Had boss man order me a wrist brace and it hasn't swelled up since. I've also been doing a 100 knuckle pushups a day in my down time at work. So far seeing good results already notice uptick in strength and slimming down. What does everybody else do these days to stay in shape?! Figured this thread could use a bump.

CDB, I had been training a 2 body parts/muscle groups x 5 days split (with cardio x 6 days) for the last several months. However, my two oldest sons & I just switched to an upper/lower body x 4 days split (aiming for cardio 6-7 days). I’ve lost 30 lbs the last few months from consistent training & a low carb diet. I initially tried paleo, but found it too demanding & restrictive for my schedule. Thus, I switched to a quasi-“Atkins” diet. However, I’m starting to plateau on my weight loss, so that’s why we switched training splits. This week, I’m seeking to keep my carbs > 40 per day & sugar grams under 20. I’d like to lose another 40-60 lbs...Lord willing.
 

celticdb15

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CDB, I had been training a 2 body parts/muscle groups x 5 days split (with cardio x 6 days) for the last several months. However, my two oldest sons & I just switched to an upper/lower body x 4 days split (aiming for cardio 6-7 days). I’ve lost 30 lbs the last few months from consistent training & a low carb diet. I initially tried paleo, but found it too demanding & restrictive for my schedule. Thus, I switched to a quasi-“Atkins” diet. However, I’m starting to plateau on my weight loss, so that’s why we switched training splits. This week, I’m seeking to keep my carbs > 40 per day
& sugar grams under 20. I’d like to lose another 40-60 lbs...Lord willing.

Good news Dixie keep up the good work. That's awesome your son's train with you!
 

DixieDestroyer

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Good news Dixie keep up the good work. That's awesome your son's train with you!

Thanks much! My middle son is a pretty good athlete (CC, hoops & track...800m, 1600m). He has phenomenal endurance & runs a 5 minute mile (@ 13 & 5’11, 140 lbs). My eldest is thicker built (6’2, 225) like me, and trains martial arts. They’re good students & kids. I’m (very) blessed to have them (all)! :)
 

Don Wassall

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I like this article.

THE BARBELL AND ITS DISCONTENTS​


By Chivalry Guild

“I don’t even lift, bro,” Adam Ellwanger announces in the title of his recent critique of right-wing bodybuilding (RWBB). A few paragraphs into his essay you can tell how true his claim is — not because the author confesses to being a little overweight, but because he mostly leans on Revenge of the Nerds cliches about training. If the author did lift, he might understand the reasons for lifting a little better. That said, his sympathetic critique is made in good faith — and should be answered accordingly.

I will begin with the author’s sturdiest critique: that RWBB culture “confuses muscular definition with fitness.” Fair enough if he added a qualifier: potentially. Personally, I’d prefer an explicit acknowledgment of the importance of martial arts and athletics than the term “bodybuilding” evokes. Aesthetics certainly matters, but aesthetics must reflect a deeper reality: prowess. Achilles and Richard the Lionheart didn’t win honor simply by looking good, but through courage made possible by athletic capacity. Aesthetics divorced from genuine prowess is fake.

Perhaps Ellwanger has a different experience of lifters, but I’d venture that nine out of ten lifters already get this. Their ideal model is closer to UFC star Paulo Costa than Mr. Universe. The martial artist is not only more athletic than the competitive flexer — he also just looks better.

In any case, the author moves beyond this insistence on fitness and expands his critique to physical aspiration itself. Modern life doesn’t necessitate serious fitness, which means disciplined training verges on uselessness. “It is extraordinarily rare that I encounter a necessary physical task that I am unable to achieve,” he writes. “In other words, I don’t really have a use for more muscle.”

The claim is correct only because modern life is itself fake, a historical aberration which trains a man to sacrifice his dignity for comfort. Man was not born to spend his life at an office park before driving back home to drink IPA on a couch. It’s fair to ask questions of a man who absolves himself of the duty to rise above the physical mediocrity of a way of life so false and harmful.

Furthermore, the mascara and lip gloss with which the modern order did itself up are beginning to fade. Reality is coming back hard and fast. Nobody paying attention in recent years should have failed to observe the direction of travel, without feeling compelled to ready himself for rougher times ahead.

Ellwanger proceeds to suggest training is motivated by selfishness: “it ultimately serves only the self, since others reap no benefit from someone else’s great strength.” Of course training can be a selfish pursuit — but to say it must be reveals an atomized view of reality. Strength makes a man more useful to others, creating opportunities for generosity and service. A chivalrous man’s strength means his loved ones are safer. He inspires the Roland Effect. As Gautier says to the great knight, “Never did I know fear when you were there.” A sentiment like that should make a claim on the heart; it should awaken longings to be a certain kind of man.

Ellwanger then repeats probably the most popular clams by non-lifters: it takes too much time. Training requires “a near-monomaniacal appetite for exercise that elevates the gym to a second residence.”

This argument has three responses: first, and most simply, with a good training program, serious gains can be achieved reasonably efficiently. Second, training returns time to us, or at least changes the quality of time by boosting energy. Hormones, good vibes, and improvement supercharge the spirit and maximize our ability to make the most of the days given to us. Finally, some guys might spend a lot of time working out because they like spending time in the gym, and why not? The relentless drive of get-in-and-get-out commercialism has made “third-place” establishments (i.e. spaces between home and work) increasingly rare in modern life. A good gym is one of the last places on earth where men can spend time with their friends, and make new ones.

Finally, Ellwanger turns up the political seriousness when suggesting that training as an imperative partakes in the liberal “deification and worship of the self-creating individual.” It is just the flipside of a coin with transgenderism or body positivity on the other side. This might be true of competitive bodybuilders. Nonetheless, the key point is that the gym is where a man can learn about the power of his own agency, among other lessons.

Two centuries ago Tocqueville suggested one of the drifts of a mass society is the helplessness a man feels in the face of a giant impersonal social machinery and the soft despotism which robs a man of all use of himself. Effective attempts to resist this drift can begin with lifting, sprinting, grappling, and hitting the heavy bag.

Maybe this sounds like an underwhelming solution. But the man who pursues it will experience an undeniable transformation. He will become stronger, more formidable, more handsome, more confident. Just as importantly, when he sees the difference, he will begin to draw connections between effort and reward. This is less about becoming a supersoldier in a culture war and more about learning that we are never so helpless as modern life tempts us to think. If a man trains with his friends, the effects multiply and this small group may become a formidable bunch all together.

Doors open to men of agency. The task before us then, as Tocqueville says, is to “raise the faculties of men, not to complete their prostration.” Together with physical strength, training brings the possibility of spiritual, moral, and social gains.

Ellwanger doesn’t know this — because he doesn’t lift!

I do lift, and the best times of my own life have come because I’ve been carrying muscle. It’s just a better way to live. Modern life is set up to wreck the natural beauty of the healthy human body and prepare a man for consumer servitude. Chemicals, cubicles, dopamine fixes, fake foods, fake stress, dumb propaganda: it’s a nonstop campaign against human flourishing and vitality. Physical training is the proper self-defense.

Chivalry Guild is a writer. He writes on thechivalryguild.substack.com.​


 

Bucky

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Worthy of a bump for sure Don! Going to reshare that elsewhere.
 

Don Wassall

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Check out the pictures and videos of RFK Jr. at age 69 and ignore the typical fake news garbage in the article itself about Jake Tapper. Very impressive!

 

chris371

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I eat lots of meat and verggies and 6 eggs a day. I lift and Box. Thid is what i Look like. No carbs, no running/Jogging etc, no sugar.
 

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