Brett Favre

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Sterger does not plan to sue Favre, as long as he is disciplined by NFL

I am not buying this story at all.

Why did it take her TWO YEARS to make this situation public, if these pictures offended her so much???

The reality is, as a married man, Favre is handcuffed. Anything he says in his "defense" will tarnish his image even further.

The situation seems pretty obvious to me. Sterger and Favre had an affair while Favre was playing in New York. During the course of the relationship Sterger got the pictures. It could have been as simple as her asking Brett for a few pictures to "remember him by" during a trip to an away game, for instance. Of course, it would have pleased Favre's ego to send the pictures.

At some point, the situation went foul, and Sterger has tried to take full advantage of the situation by humiliating Favre and gaining her 30 seconds of fame.

Favre, of course, has not commented on the issue because he is married. Saying the pictures were sent in the context of a relationship might look less humiliating on one hand but it would tarnish his reputation as a married man.

The idea that a multi-millionaire, superstar, Hall of Fame quarterback, celebrity athlete would jeopardize his image by sending nude photos to a complete stranger is beyond ludicrous. Surely he can't be that desperate.

She doesn't even need to sue Favre. She can make more money, through her looks, by maintaining an altruistic image. She has already created the appearance of millionaire athletes bending over backwards to seduce her. Obviously that has marketing appeal. Edited by: TorontoArgos
 

Don Wassall

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There's a good chance Favre won't be starting tomorrow, ending what Michael Irvin just called on the NFL Network "the greatest accomplishment in professional sports." And he might be right -- 297 consecutive starts over 19 years, 321 including playoffs, at a position that takes a beating every game, an amazing accomplishment.

Cal Ripken was baseball's ultimate Iron Man, but Favre is pro sports' ultimate Iron Man.

I remember the bittersweet day when Ripken voluntarily ended his great streak in 1999. The fans and the opposing team paid tribute to him. I hope the same is done for Favre but it won't surprise me if it doesn't happen given the league's demographics and the widespread dislike of Favre in the media and among DWFs. Also, the Vikings will be playing a "home" game in Detroit before a small and likely unfriendly crowd. Not the final season Brett would have wanted, but his greatness and toughness can never be denied.
 

white is right

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I recall many iron man streaks unceremoniously ending in baseball. I once recall the Blue Jays manager ending Alfredo Griffin's streak by not realizing that his streak was ending and not entering him as pinch hitter, but he did play him as a pinch runner but because he didn't play a full inning the streak was over. Usually when the streaks end the next home game the player is honored by his home team.
 

WHITE NOISE

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I like that the Vikings have used Booker on third down rather than Toby Gerhart. F the Vikings and their AA "coach"
 

backrow

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they've only used Booker on a few snaps, it was usually Toby. too bad he's only seen 3 carries and 1 catch!
 

white is right

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I actually found this quite humorous for once...
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What if Favre's streak never happened?

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Gallo By DJ Gallo
Page 2
Archive | Contact

Brett FavreAP Photo/David StlukaEven if Brett Favre's record streak never occurred, the media would find myriad ways to worship him.

Brett Favre's fabled streak is over. We'll likely never see anything like it again in the NFL.

While many aren't sad to see the old gunslinger go, it's difficult to underestimate Favre's impact on football. But what if his streak had never gotten started? What if his early struggles had short-circuited his football career? The NFL, the world and life itself would be very different.

1992: Brett Favre gets the first start of his career against the Pittsburgh Steelers. He finishes his first season as a starter with solid numbers -- 18 touchdowns and an 85.3 passer rating -- but also 13 interceptions and six fumbles.

1993: Favre regresses noticeably in his second year, throwing 19 touchdowns and an NFL-worst 24 interceptions with eight fumbles. Favre's poor play sabotages a talented Green Bay team, which includes Reggie White, and the Packers finish 9-7 and lose to the Cowboys in the playoffs & behind two more Favre interceptions.

1994: Because of Favre's disappointing '93 season and off-the-field concerns, the Packers reacquire Don Majkowski, who threw for 4,318 yards with the Packers in 1989, and open the job up in training camp. "The Majik Man," now 30, beats out Favre for the starting job. Behind Majkowski's veteran leadership, the Packers get by the Cowboys and 49ers in the NFC playoffs and dominate the Chargers in the Super Bowl.

1995: With Majkowski having a firm hold on the starting job and in light of Favre's continued immaturity, the Packers release Favre in the final round of cuts in training camp. He is unable to catch on with another team. NFL broadcaster John Madden announces his retirement, saying, "There is an unexplainable void in my life." The Packers win Super Bowl XXX over the Pittsburgh Steelers.

1996: Favre's former team, the Atlanta Falcons, gives him a shot in training camp to compete for a job with Jeff George. The competition pushes George, the former No. 1 overall pick, to finally reach his potential. Favre is eventually cut, as Atlanta chooses veteran Bobby Hebert as backup. Favre announces he is done with football at age 27. George wins NFL MVP, and Majkowski and the Packers beat the Patriots in the Super Bowl. The Madden video game franchise folds. The video game industry itself also suffers major financial setbacks.

1997: His competitive fires still burning, Favre takes up lawn mower racing. He wins the U.S. Lawn Mower Racing Association title in his first season. Majkowski and the Packers win their fourth consecutive Super Bowl, as "Majikslinger" becomes a household term. With the video game industry in ruins, the tech bubble bursts.

1998: The economy goes into steep decline. Because of lack of competition from Majkowski's complete dominance, interest in the NFL wanes. High ticket prices in a poor economy also keep many fans away. Meanwhile, Favre wins another USLMRA title with a dramatic comeback on the final lap. Attendance soars for the down-home, affordable sport. Favre signs a lucrative endorsement contract with Wrangler.

1999: The NFL pushes through another season but announces it will take the 2000 season off in hopes of restructuring and staving off bankruptcy. The economy continues to crumble. Favre loses his first USLMRA title but wins countless more fans by accidentally mowing off his foot with a lead on the final lap. He has his foot re-attached and grittily finishes the race. He also serves as USLMRA commissioner in 1999, and the circuit enjoys record profits and earns a national TV contract.

2000: Despite two bright spots -- the jeans and lawn mower industries -- the U.S. economy continues to freefall. In such a climate, many voters seek out a populist, outsider candidate. They seek out Favre. Despite initially rebuffing a run for president with his aw-shucks charm, Favre gives in to pressure and goes on a late mower-stop tour around the country.

Polls leading up the election see Favre with a massive lead over Al Gore and George W. Bush, and the two major party candidates all but concede to the former quarterback on Election Day. However, the write-in candidacy fails, as the vast majority of voters misspell Favre's name as "Farve." A protracted recount eventually lands in the Supreme Court and all "Farve" votes are thrown out.

2001: The country falls into anarchy. With riots in the streets, Favre -- the country's desired leader -- finally addresses the nation, requests calm and appeals to America's better instincts. "This is a big world with adult problems," Favre says. "But remember the hope and promise of our youth. Let's all be like a kid out there." The president, vice president and Speaker of the House all resign, paving the way for Favre's ascension to president in a special election.

2002: President Favre immediately gets the country back on track with common-sense reform policies. The work week is expanded to seven days, even if you are hurt or sick. And people can still collect Social Security after age 65, but only after retiring and unretiring and retiring again five times -- which ultimately pushes the retirement age to 70. Even President Favre's unpopular moves are sold to the public by an adoring media, which celebrates everything he does.

2003: The economy, still led by the lawn mower and jeans sectors, continues to rebound, thanks to an uptick in the tech market behind the smashing success of "President Favre's Lawn Mower Racin'" by EA Sports and the president's support for the camera phone industry. Other industries struggle, though. Most razor manufacturers go out of business, as do men's clothing companies that specialize in anything not denim.

2004: President Favre easily wins re-election but international pressures start to mount, specifically from Canada. While the NFL was shuttered, the CFL made a grab for the league's top players. Americans begin to resent Canada's attempt to profit from a weakened United States.

2005: American-Canadian tensions continue to rise. French-speaking Canadians taunt the American president by openly pronouncing his name as it's spelled. The president fires back by saying much of the tundra-covered, frozen nation is not even worth mowing.

2006: Favre's popularity begins to wane as the economy keeps sputtering, and the public pushes back against the media's over-the-top love affair with the president. Favre announces he is considering retiring at the end of the year, which would turn the nation over to his young, promising vice president. But then he announces he will return. Favre also cuts off jeans imports to Canada, forcing the nation to weather its winters in nothing but hockey pants.

2007: President Favre enjoys a successful legislative season, after which he announces his resignation. The vice president takes office. His removal eases tensions with Canada.

2008: Favre announces he wants to be president again and attempts a coup. Even some in the media, long his biggest supporter, start to turn against him. His coup attempt is put down and he instead becomes mayor of New York City.

2009: After a disastrous year as mayor, Favre announces his retirement. He then suddenly unretires, becomes a Canadian citizen and takes over as the nation's prime minister. Bent on revenge, Favre restarts Canada's nuclear program. U.S.-Canadian tensions hit an all-time high.

2010: Prime Minister Favre launches a nuclear weapon at the United States. It is intercepted.

The Packers win the Super Bowl again behind Majkowski.

DJ Gallo is the founder of SportsPickle.com. His first book, "The View from the Upper Deck," is available from only the finest bargain-book retailers. His next book project will be released soon. You can follow him on Twitter at @DJGalloESPN.
 
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"French-speaking Canadians taunt the American president by openly pronouncing his name as it's spelled."
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whiteathlete33

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It looks like Favre and Jackson are both out. Joe Webb will get the start. Another quotaback for the affirmative action coach.

According to Mike Florio of Pro Football Talk, the Vikings are expected to place Tarvaris Jackson (turf toe) on injured reserve.
<div ="s_pNewsTextMain">
It's not a surprise that Jackson is going on I.R., as he had basically
already been ruled out for Week 15 and a turf toe injury is something
that can take multiple weeks to recover from. His Vikings career is
likely over. With Brett Favre also likely out this week and possibly for
the rest of the season, Joe Webb will get the start Monday, with the
newly signed Patrick Ramsey backing him up.
</div>
 

Deadlift

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We should never be "worried" about guys like Tarvaris.. he's just a "freestyler" who will make the occasional TD pass (not all TD passes are complicated or highlight-reel), but he'll make many more mistakes and errors.

UNREAL that he got picked in the 2nd Round.. does that make Robert Griffin a 1st Rounder?
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Don Wassall

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Fran Tarkenton is no fan of Brett Favre. I would place more credence in what he says if he didn't have to first qualify criticism of Donovan McNabb with the usual White guilt blather and pandering:

Whether Donovan McNabb will be snatched up by another team if the Redskins waive him:
"I think he will be snapped up, but Donovan McNabb, God bless him, and he has been a wonderful player and a wonderful leader and a good guy. His day is done. Brett Favre's day is done, and if you guys are lucky he will try again this week and you will beat him 40-10."


Fran has nothing to say about Favre being a "wonderful" player, leader, or "good guy." This interview will likely please the Favre-haters, but to me Tarkenton comes across as a 70 year old DWF: http://deadspin.com/5717114/fran-tarkenton-pretty-much-poops-all-over-brett-favre
 

whiteathlete33

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I'm sick and tired of whites like Tarkenton. They always praise black players and black quarterbacks especially because they are supposedly being held " down" at the position. Mcnabb is a good guy huh? By that I guess he means that McNabb is one of the black players who doesn't have a criminal history. What a great accomplishment. That still doesn't make him a good guy.
 

white is right

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Tarkenton was foaming at the mouth when the Vikings signed Farve. I think it was mostly because he was a former Packer. He said there is no way in hell he would have ever worn a Packer uniform after playing so many years in Minnesota. He basically felt Farve was using the Vikings, similar to what TO has done with various clubs. Edited by: white is right
 

Kaptain

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Fran Tarkenton was/is my favorite football player of all time. His obvious jealousy and misguided comments on Favre leaves a sour taste. Fran is so concerned about the Vikings and follows them so closely that he couldn't even stay for the 50th Viking Anniversary half-time show last week. Apparently he has too many other important things to do. Never winning the Superbowl and not getting the recognition that others with lesser stats got seems to have left Tarkenton a bitter old man. The idea that Brett Favre should step aside for a worthless project like Joe Webb is absurd.
 

jaxvid

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white is right said:
Tarkenton was foaming at the mouth when the Vikings signed Farve.

Jerry Seinfeld did a very funny routine on that sort of thing.

"Loyalty to any one sports team is hard to justify because players are always changing, the team can move to another city..... What you're really doing is cheering for the clothes. You're yelling and cheering for your clothes to beat the clothes from another city. .....People are so in love with a particular player but if he goes to another team they boo him!"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jIN_bGE52SU
 
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