"Blacks are fading from baseball"

Bucky

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Jul 20, 2018
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i hope blacks do fade from baseball ... then fade away from everything and everyone else in this country.

“i have a dream today!”

I have a dream I can walk the streets of once great cities like Detroit, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Chicago, New York, etc. And not get jumped, robbed, murdered!
 

Booth

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Blacks may be fading from baseball but 4 out the top 5 picks in this year's MLB draft are black. The number 1 pick was Matt Holliday's son, Jackson Holliday.
 

Bucky

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Blacks may be fading from baseball but 4 out the top 5 picks in this year's MLB draft are black. The number 1 pick was Matt Holliday's son, Jackson Holliday.

pure Cohencidence
 

Phall

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The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport at Central Florida issued its annual report card for Major League Baseball's diversity hiring practices on Thursday. For the second consecutive season, TIDES reported a record-low percentage of Black players on MLB Opening Day rosters, according to the Associated Press.

Per TIDES' research, just 6.2% of players on Opening Day rosters were Black. Last season, that percentage was 7.2%. For context, Black players represented 18% of the league when the study began, back in 1991.

TIDES' findings come months after the Houston Astros and Philadelphia Phillies played the first World Series since 1950 that did not feature a single Black player born in the United States. (Jackie Robinson integrated MLB in 1947.) Dusty Baker, the winning manager last October who remains one of two Black skippers, said the following at the time: "What hurts is that I don't know how much hope that it gives some of the young African-American kids. Because when I was their age, I had a bunch of guys, [Willie] Mays, [Hank] Aaron, Frank Robinson, Tommy Davis -- my hero -- Maury Wills, all these guys. We need to do something before we lose them."

Overall, TIDES gave MLB a B for racial hiring and a C for gender hiring.
 

Jimmy Chitwood

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good news!
 

Don Wassall

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I was just looking over an old Sports Illustrated from October 1979, and there's a letter to the editor in the back titled "Blacks in Baseball." The letter itself is nothing memorable as it simply uses common sense and statistics to rebut SI's position, which according to the letter writer is that baseball had an "enduring color line" at that time, quite an inflammatory phrase that SI undoubtedly didn't back with any real evidence beyond crying racism. Mind you this was the 1970s, which along with the '60s are sentimentally viewed by the hive mind media as the glory days of Blacks in baseball. It's so long ago that Joe Morgan was still playing at the time and would go on to play five more MLB seasons before later devolving into the corporate media's go-to professional whiner on the topic of Blacks in baseball. It just shows that the agenda and narrative was being pushed even during their heyday. Here's the letter:

"Your Scorecard item (Oct. 8) suggesting that there is an 'enduring color line' in baseball made some curious points. Among others were 1. that no more than 10% of recent draft choices are black and 2. that with Willie Mays and Henry Aaron gone, blacks do not identify with baseball the way they once did. Omitted was the fact that according to the last census only 11% of the U.S. population is black. Thus, if the 10% figure compares unfavorably with basketball and football, I suggest that the latter sports have a disproportionately high share of black prospects. Concerning the absence of Mays and Aaron, if black youths cannot identify with the likes of Dave Parker, Willie Stargell, Reggie Jackson, Jim Rice, et al., then they probably cannot identify with the Ervings, McAdoos, Paytons and Simpsons.

"Baseball may need more black managers, umpires and spectators, but it does not suffer from a lack of black players or stars."

H.W. Marlow
Lake Zurich, Illinois
 
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