Rohan Browning 10.01

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When you read a thread like this one thing that stands out to me is that even if browning never breaks 10.0 in the 100 he is still an elite sprinter. He is also apparently bright enough to study law. I’m guessing that even if bolt wasn’t using drugs that combination of brains and athleticism must be incredibly rare and something to be proud of. It also means he’s probably faster than everyone in the nfl by a good margin. Sooooo why can’t whitey play cornerback again?

It's the system. If you have a talented white CB in high school the coach will encourage them to play Safety as they believe their chances of getting recruited to college will increase as a Safety versus Cornerback. If they remain a Cornerback and happen to get recruited to College the same thing happens- Encouraged to play Safety.

https://247sports.com/Season/2021-Football/CompositeRecruitRankings/?Position=CB
Jason Marshall is ranked as the #2 Cornerback recruit in 2021. His 100m time is 11.13 and his 200m is 22.29.
https://stonybrookathletics.com/sports/mens-track-and-field/roster/jason-marshall/5990

There are plenty of white HS players that can run sub 11. The coaches will justify not playing them as CB by saying they only have "straight line speed" or some other bs. Welcome to the caste!
 

white is right

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It's the system. If you have a talented white CB in high school the coach will encourage them to play Safety as they believe their chances of getting recruited to college will increase as a Safety versus Cornerback. If they remain a Cornerback and happen to get recruited to College the same thing happens- Encouraged to play Safety.

https://247sports.com/Season/2021-Football/CompositeRecruitRankings/?Position=CB
Jason Marshall is ranked as the #2 Cornerback recruit in 2021. His 100m time is 11.13 and his 200m is 22.29.
https://stonybrookathletics.com/sports/mens-track-and-field/roster/jason-marshall/5990

There are plenty of white HS players that can run sub 11. The coaches will justify not playing them as CB by saying they only have "straight line speed" or some other bs. Welcome to the caste!
Yes you have to know that a typical winning coach has to have contacts at the college level to funnel guys into programs. If you have a white tailback or corner you have to assume that if he can chew gum and walk at the same time he must know unless that player is a CMAC type he will be ignored or slotted to play in the slot or safety at the next level. Even CMAC might have been slotted to play the slot if his pops wasn't a former star NFL player who had contacts at the next level.

Dead Castean god Massah Bowden said it to a reporter and wasn't called out for saying it, if he said that about Blacks playing qb it would have been off to the coaching glue factory and time to get the golf handicap below 20...
 

white is right

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The fastest players in the NFL only run a 10.40's to 10.60's in the 100 meters. Any elite sprinter around the world would blow their doors off. Rohan Browing ran 10.01
this summer at the Olympics. He also ran 10.09! Anyone with eyes can clearly see that he will go sub 10! Yes he is as smart as they come.
DK Metcalf ran about 10.3 and got his door blow off by decent but not 100m final or even semi-final sprinters. NFL player speed for the most part is highly overrated.
 

white lightning

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DK Metcalf ran about 10.3 and got his door blow off by decent but not 100m final or even semi-final sprinters. NFL player speed for the most part is highly overrated.

A white high school sprinter named Gavin Schurr could equal or beat that time. Metcalf is the fastest player in the nfl but that is slow compared to sprinters.
 

white lightning

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Let's get this thread back on track. It's supposed to be about Rohan Browning. The other stuff should be in the regular track section. Yes I'm guilty of getting
offtrack too but let's focus on Browning in this thread. Thanks guys.
 

white lightning

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https://worldathletics.org/athletes...australia&counrty=australia&counrty=australia
iu
 

white lightning

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Rohan Browning verse a horse in a race. Never saw this till recently. This is for you Mastermulti. :)

 

mastermulti

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haha thanks WL. Yes, I'd seen it and dismissed it as silly - 11.46 in joggers(?) and long pants on thick grass. Myeh! I guess he was paid good money
 

mastermulti

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with the indoor season not far from a start I found the only timed 60 metres I think Browning has done. It's outside because we have no indoor tracks in the whole country but it's virtually zero wind so I'm not sure how that converts to running on the boards. He'll just have to get used to the different feedback I guess, but how I'd love to see low 6.50s or even 6.49 from him.

Shirvo's Australian record is 6.53

http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=rohan+browning&&view=detail&mid=FA58279C2AA8451AE6B7FA58279C2AA8451AE6B7&&FORM=VRDGAR&ru=/videos/search?q=rohan+browning&FORM=HDRSC3
 

white lightning

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As many of you here on this board know, I predicted 3 sprinters to go sub 10 wind legal in 2022. Rohan Browning is one of them. He opened up with a 10.12 and then
had some injuries in training. So he has only had 1 race so far this year. I do believe that is a blessing in disguise as he will be far fresher coming into the summer season
in europe and especially for the 2022 World Championships of Track & Field in Eugene, Oregon this summer!

This is a great breakdown from a track coach that goes over the mechanics of his 10.01 from last years Olympics. Good video for pointing out what he has done right
and for what he still needs to work on to dip into the sub 10 category. I have no doubt it will happen in the next couple of months!
 

mastermulti

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I was pleasantly surprised to see California Performance Lab pick up on Ro-Han after that Olympic heat. Some stuff there to work on
 

white lightning

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This is for mastermulti or anyone else that can tell me when Rohan Browning will be racing again? It's been a long time and I'm sure he is back to full health. I think
missing the majority of the Australian Season will be a huge blessing for him. He will be fresh and ready to peak this summer for the World Championships of Track
and Field as well as traveling to alot of European Meets to make some good money. The experience will make him a better sprinter! I'm guessing he opens up sometime
in May like most of the bigger stars.
 

mastermulti

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I just scrolled those results from Switzerland. Everyone seems to want to run there because of the fast times.
Interestingly Dafne Schippers ran 11.13 legal there this weekend and Dovile Kilty (Richard's wife) tripled 14.27m to look well into form now having recovered from birth of Richard Jr. He and his dad were probably in the stands watching

https://www.worldathletics.org/comp...tinental-tour/calendar-results/7176905/result
 

white lightning

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For those that couldn't open the link to the article about Rohan Browning and his chase for the elusive sub 10!

Australia's Rohan Browning is on a mission to break the magical 10-second barrier — and then some — in the men's 100 metres

Rohan Browning admits it could be lurking anywhere.

It could be in what he eats for dinner, or up to the vagaries of the weather.

It's so small and imperceptible that searching for it could drive him to neurosis.

But it's also the main motivation for the second-fastest man in Australian history.

"It" is those couple hundredths of a second that he needs to break the 10-second barrier, in the men's 100 metres.

"I'd be lying if I said it wasn't always in the back of my mind whenever I race," Browning told ABC Sport from his training base in Rome.

"That is, to some degree, an arbitrary marker, because the depth of the event is so strong now [that] sub-10, or 9.99, doesn't guarantee that you'll make an Olympic final.

"But 9 point sounds a lot better than 10 point and I think that does demarcate, to some degree, a truly world-class sprinter."

From impostor to the real deal

Only one Australian man has ever run under 10 seconds: Patrick Johnson clocked 9.93 in 2003.

Browning is now the second-best ever in this country after winning his heat at last year's Tokyo Olympics in a scintillating 10.01 seconds.

It was one of the biggest moments of the 24-year-old's career, as the "flying mullet" became an instant national hero.

However, he faded in the semi-finals, his 10.09-second run wasn't enough to progress to the final.

"I was really shocked by the reaction, and it was lovely and I felt incredibly well-supported," he said.

"But, to be honest, I didn't feel deserving of it at all. I felt like a total impostor. Because, at a major championship, you need to get into the final and that was the expectation that I had, and not quite meeting that bar meant I left the Olympics feeling disappointed."

Browning has a chance to rectify that in a few weeks, when he'll contest the Athletics World Championships in the US state of Oregon, and the Commonwealth Games in England's Birmingham, back to back.

It's a chance for Browning to show how far he's come, and whether he can be considered among the world's elite runners.

And to do that, just sneaking under that 10-second mark won't cut it: 20 men have already achieved that this year.

How do you find those hundredths of a second?

Browning has been working with his coach, Andrew Murphy, and Athletics Australia's National Lead of Biomechanics, Dr Emma Millet, to break down his technique and identify where he can muster up even more speed.

Dr Millet says Browning's top speed is world class, but there's room for improvement in his start out of the blocks and his acceleration over the first 30 metres.

And, in such a short race, even the smallest factor can make a massive difference.

"It can be all about the positions that you are in the blocks and how you load your blocks," Dr Millet said.

"So, you can have the exact same foot spacing between them, but if you set too high or are too far forward over your hand, you don't get that good clearance.

"And it's been how do we tap into that feeling for Rohan, so that he can execute it on the day?"

There has also been a focus on ensuring Browning doesn't over-stride once he's out of the blocks.

"I think he's more than capable of running sub-10," Dr Millet said.

"He's done so well to do 10.01 and it wasn't a perfectly executed race, either, and that's where there's still heaps of room to move.

"So, I'm really excited to see where he might go, whether that's 9.8 or below, I don't exactly know yet, because we haven't got all the pieces of the puzzle together."

"What I'm focused on is trying to be as efficient as possible," Browning said.

"So I try to apply a critical mind to everything and, when working with my coach, we try to really focus on where we're going to get the greatest output, rather than just glorifying hard running, hard work, being tough all the time. We try to work smarter."

Browning is conscious of not being "paralysed by data", but he knows making what may seem like unnoticeable changes to the average observer, could be the difference between him being a good runner, and a great one.

And that's come with some growing pains.

He knows he hasn't raced at his best this season, and injuries and illness haven't helped.

"This year, we've really overhauled my race model to focus on trying to extend that acceleration a little bit and then hit top end speed a bit later, so that in the last 20 to 30 meters of the race, I'm not decelerating as much," he said.

"Whenever you're trying out a new model, you're trying to break all these motor patterns that are so deeply ingrained after so many years. It's really hard.

"It makes you very error-prone, so that's something I'm trying to master now. And I think that's probably why I haven't run quite as quick as I would have liked to in some of the races.

"But I'm confident that, by the major championships, it'll come together."

He'll face his biggest test yet at this week's Stockholm Diamond League, in a field that includes the Olympic champion, Italy's Lamont Marcell Jacobs.

"I think he's one of the most technically efficient runners in the world," Browning said.

"And that's a significant reason why he's been able to be so successful at major championships under pressure, because he's able to maintain such a relaxed disposition."

Dr Millet says Jacobs' run in the Olympic final was near perfect, and something for Browning to draw inspiration from.

"Marcell is one of those ones [who] you saw in Tokyo, where his ability to get out of the blocks, has a great top speed and not decelerate, he was able to execute a really good race," she said.

"He was a 10-second runner, and then has, last season [has] gone well below and managed to really execute it in the final."

Finding his 'perfect day'

While 2022 hasn't gone exactly to plan for Browning so far, he's optimistic he can pull everything together come the World Championships and Commonwealth Games.

"I want to be in the final and then I want to try [to] execute the best race that I know how and I'll see where that puts me in the world," he said.

"I think that, over the next month, my true positioning in the world will materialise and I'll have a pretty good picture of where that sits."

And it's not just about collecting silverware, or running sub-10s.

"What I'm really focused on this year is bringing my average performance down and not having those outliers," he said.

"I want to be as consistent as possible, as unglamorous as that is, so that I know what I'm capable of when it comes to big moments in the major championships.

"Rather than celebrating the glittering moments of brilliance that are just very transient. It's all about doing it when it counts."

Browning is also a big believer in balance.

For him, that includes studying law at Sydney University, spending time with his friends and family, and playing golf, even if he is a self-confessed hacker.

"It's just so easy to get wrapped up in the point 001 of a second in sport, that it can drive you to that neurosis," he said.

"It's so important to decompress. That helps get the best out of yourself on the track."

Browning has also tapped into some of Australia's greatest athletes — such as Cathy Freeman and and Steve Waugh — for advice along the way.

And the prospect of having a moment like Freeman's 400m victory at the Sydney Olympics, or Waugh's "perfect day", last ball century at the SCG are tantalising.

"Every athlete romanticises the idea of having a moment like that in their career," Browning said.

"There's a Brisbane Olympics coming up in 2032. I think I'll be 34 by then, so I'll see if I'm still around.

"I think the prospect of a home Games and [2026 regional Victoria] Commonwealth Games definitely inspire me to keep pushing."
 

mastermulti

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that article on Browning is excellent. They've actually talked to him and got his mindset through to us. He's certainly a pensive and analytical person. And he was making points that we track afficianados understand - eg, the idea of breaking old habits and starting with a new mold.
That he was prepared to temporarily lose performance and refocus his technique rather than same old, same old is refreshing.
I hope it works out for him ...... and I wish Jack Hale would do likewise

I contend Browning ran equivalent to a legitimate sub 10.20 - but not near a 10.08 if on other tracks like Oregon. He may though in a few weeks
 
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white lightning

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With his last race of a time of 10.02 with 0 Wind Rohan Browning has now went below 10.10 a total of 7 times. Then add in
another 3 races of 10.10, 10.12 and 10.12 again! That is about as consistant as you could ever be without going sub 10. If you look
at all of these races only 3 races had a wind of 1.0 or better. So he had 0 wind, little wind or negative wind. A case of bad luck but
in the long run it's made him a stronger & more talented sprinter. The best Australia has ever seen and he will be the fastest sprinter
in the history of Australia before it's all said and done. Rohan is 25 years old now and just entering his prime yeas of sprinting! Here
is the video from a few days ago with Browing winning another Australian Championship in a blazing time & just missing a sub 10.
I have no doubt he is about to break through and then we could see him go sub 9.95 next.


mqdefault.jpg
 
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white lightning

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Rohan Browing All-time Personal Top 10

CompetitionCnt.ResultWindEventDatePlaceCatType Nr.ScoreRecord
The XXXII Olympic Games, National Stadium, TokyoJPN10.01+0.8100 Metres31 JUL 20211.OWH71203
Australian Championships, Queensland Sport and Athletics Centre, Nathan, BrisbaneAUS10.020.0100 Metres01 APR 20231.BF1199
Queensland Track Classic, Queensland Sport and Athletics Centre, Nathan, BrisbaneAUS10.05+1.0100 Metres27 MAR 20211.BF1189
Queensland International Track Classic, BrisbaneAUS10.08+2.0100 Metres23 MAR 20192.BF11179
Résisprint International, Stade de La Charrière, La Chaux-de-FondsSUI10.08+1.6100 Metres03 JUL 20225.DF11179
The XXXII Olympic Games, National Stadium, TokyoJPN10.09-0.2100 Metres01 AUG 20215.OWSF21177
Australian Championships, SOPAC, SydneyAUS10.09+0.4100 Metres17 APR 20211.BF1176
XXII Commonwealth Games, Alexander Stadium, BirminghamGBR10.10+0.9100 Metres02 AUG 20221.AH91172
CITIUS Meeting, Stadion Wankdorf, BernSUI10.12+0.2100 Metres21 AUG 20212.CF1165
Adelaide Track Classic, SA Athletic Stadium, AdelaideAUS10.12+0.9100 Metres12 FEB 20221.DF11165
 

mastermulti

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mate, I was looking at exactly just these figures on IAAF site this morning. My post was to be similar - 8 times of 10.10 or better and a top 10 run average of 10.076. This will of course keep coming down. That average is far and away better than Kilty, Reus, and other white sprinters with 10.01s have achieved. His average is similar to Tortu who had that 9.99 - 4 good times for 2018 , 1 in 2019 and 1 in 2020.
And as you say, Browning doesn't need any wind to do these times

Shirvington was our previous most consistent sprinter but that didn't last long. Patrick Johnson's 9.93 (+1.9) was backed up by only 2 x 10.05s. It would be a travesty if Browning doesn't get sub 10 and the Australian record.

He is going to Europe for some racing to try to get the Australian Worlds Champs qualifier of 10.00 (a tough gig). Even if he doesn't get the time he'll get enough points up to qualify. Selectors will certainly be on his side.

Here's a great story about a great day for his coach Andrew Murphy on Saturday. He left his son Connor's triple jump to watch Rohan run the 100 final. During the 100 final the jump he missed seeing a 41cms PB for Connor, jumping 16.62m (54'6") for the equal first place.

A sadder story was that our best sprinter just prior to Browning was Joshua Clarke who ran a great 10.15 in 2016 aged 20 after knocking off a little each year for the previous 5 years or so. This latest meet, after working his backside off to get back that speed, he was metres ahead at 50m in his heat and, bang went the hamstring yet again. He always does a hamstring when running rounds. His body just won't co-operate.
 
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white lightning

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When ever Rohan races I get pumped like I used to with Matthew Shirvington back in the day. The crowd just knows they are
about to witness something special. I love his attitude and how he says to go sub 10 is just the start to becoming world class. The
guy gets it at every level. Good luck to Browing in Europe. I hope another few Aussies join him if they are able to financially.
 
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If Browning leaned at the finish line he might have run under 10. I mean I sprinted in high school and college. Leaning at the tape is like sprinting 101. Damnn.
 
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