Foreign Players on U.S. College Teams

Don Wassall

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Interesting letter on one of V-DARE's forums. At least fourteen Division I teams are entirely non-American. That's obscene:


<A name=b1></A>A Former NCAA Division I Tennis Player Says His Foreign-Born Teammates Were "Always Ready To Take, Rarely To Give Back"; etc.


From: Kevin Carnell (e-mail him)


Re: Joe Guzzardi's Column: Another Thing American Kids Can't Doâ€â€￾Play Tennis?


With Wimbledon now in progress, I have been thinking back to my days as a collegiate tennis player for UW-Green Bay, a small Division I university. And I cannot think about college tennis without the sub-topic of foreign-born players. An Internet search led me to Guzzardi's dead on correct column.


I graduated in 2000 and am the coordinator of an annual alumni match. None of the foreign-born players that were on my team attend mainly because I have no way to find them.


They don't keep in touch. Most finish their tennis careers and vanish. The foreign-born players are always ready to take but rarely to give back.


Here is a website, somewhat dated, that tracks the universities that have the highest percentage of foreign-born tennis players on their rosters.


The information is astonishing. Note that at least fourteen Division I teams are made up of 100 percent foreign-born.


Because of its growing dependence of non-American players, I predict that tennis on the college level will continue to decline over the years to come.


Carnell is an auto claims analyst who coaches high school varsity tennis and plays doubles on a 5.0 league.


http://www.vdare.com/letters/tl_062808.htmEdited by: Don Wassall
 
G

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Like I said. I'm paid to understand this stuff.

There is an NCAA assault on swimming, tennis, and wrestling. Swimming has resisted this due to it's great club system. Tennis and wrestling have not.

Ice hockey and boxing are in a somewhat similar situation, though not because of any NCAA assault. Those are sports that Americans don't do anymore, which is why there are few good Americans in the NHL, and slim chances for American boxing medals in Beijing.
 

Don Wassall

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nevada said:
Like I said. I'm paid to understand this stuff.

There is an NCAA assault on swimming, tennis, and wrestling. Swimming has resisted this due to it's great club system. Tennis and wrestling have not.

Ice hockey and boxing are in a somewhat similar situation, though not because of any NCAA assault. Those are sports that Americans don't do anymore, which is why there are few good Americans in the NHL, and slim chances for American boxing medals in Beijing.


What a surprise -- another chest-thumping, self-celebratory post from Nevada.


I thought your position was that white Americanathletes aren't interested in playing tennis (and that tennis players can't even be considered athletes), just as now you're claiming Americans aren't playing hockey anymore. Oh, really? Maybe not in Las Vegas, but check the northern tier states from the Dakotas on east; hockey is extremely popular on both the high school and collegiate levels (and also at the peewee level). It's also getting bigger and better in highly populated states like Pennsylvania and Ohio. And a lot more kids are playing it now in Sunbelt cities than before the NHL expanded southward.


Do you have any empirical data to back up your statementthat Americans no longer playhockey? I doubt it, since you never responded to my post in the Tiger Woods thread asking where you got your "evidence" that seven times more kids have taken up wrestling than golf.Nor did you respond to my query as to your definition of "athlete." Guess you weretoo busy working on your "Attention Morons" thread in the Boxing forum.Edited by: Don Wassall
 

jaxvid

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The idea that our college sports teams are populated by foreigners is absurd. They should shut down the teams if US kids are not on them. Another example of foreign aid that we shouldn't be paying.

As for US kids not wanting to play hockey--nevada is, as usual, smoking crack. I went to every UM home game this year and bought a program to each one. I checked what percentage of players were from the state that the team was located in.

Michigan plays in the CCHA probably the top conference in the country. Most teams had 70-80% in-state kids, a couple of the most northern schools had some Canadian kids and a few, such as Michigan had some foreign players. Teams like Wisconsin, Minnesota, Lake Superior State, Michigan Tech, were almost completely populated by kids from that state. The only team that had more out-state kids then in-state was Notre Dame, for some reason hockey must not be popular in Indiana as there were only a couple from there. (Is there no ice in Indiana?)

Hockey is very popular among American kids. The college teams from what I've seen are mostly made up of local players. They are not playing on pro teams most likely because they are intelligent kids with parents who tell them to make a rational decision and not go to the junior or minor leagues and make pennies for the low odds chance of playing as a professional. Instead take that extremely expensive 4 year degree and get a start on your life's path with a good paying entry level job at somthing you can do until you retire.
 

celticdb15

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Hockey is one of the big four sports in Wisconsin. I would say football, basketball, and baseball are more popular than it, but it is deffinitely more popular than soccer. I know several kids my age that play on hockey (good) teams in Milwaukee or Chicago.
 

Don Wassall

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The sad decline of U.S. tennis continues. The hopes of American tennis now ride on the very broad shoulders of the Williams sisters.
smiley24.gif






No American player in ATP top 10 for first time

No American player is in the top 10 for the first time since the men's tennis computer rankings began in 1973.
Andy Roddick dropped from No. 9 to No. 11 in the ATP rankings issued Monday.
Roddick lost in the third round last week at the Legg Mason Tennis Classic in Washington.

U.S. men have gone 27 consecutive Grand Slam tournaments without a title. Roddick was the last American to win a major title at the 2003 U.S. Open.
Still ranked No. 1 is French Open and Wimbledon champion Rafael Nadal. The Spaniard has a lead of nearly 4,000 points over Novak Djokovic.
Roger Federer remains at No. 3, followed by Andy Murray and Robin Soderling.
http://nbcsports.msnbc.com/id/38621747
 

guest301

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The 6-10 American John Isner may be ready to crack the top ten soon and fellow American Sam Query(spelling)has been playing well of late. The US Open is coming soon and both of those players excell on the hard courts.
 

JReb1

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I root for the White tennis player/athlete regardless of which country they originate. Since it's White Europeans that have taken over tennis domination I still have the same interest in it. Though it would be nice to more White Americans in Tennis, NBA, NHL, boxing and the NFL.
 
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I see no problem with White foreigners coming to any western country and playing/representing that country. The way I see it, we are approaching the day (if we are not already there) where terms like "American", "Canadian", "Australian", etc are really of no value or significance. Is a Minnesota born Somali Muslim really even remotely related to what a American was say 40/50 years ago? Is a Haitian living in Toronto a bonified countryman of a White Canadian? I know that the posters here were not implying the above. I simply use those examples just to illustrate that many terms describing Nationality are no longer meaningful. I will cheer for a white man from Estonia before I will root for a African that was raised on the same block as me. My race is my Nation, and my race in my religion.Edited by: aussieaussie31
 
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