Winter Olympics

Discussion in 'Other Sports' started by guest301, Feb 12, 2010.

  1. foobar75

    foobar75 Master

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    What a day! Bode Miller wins gold, and then Team USA beats Canada 5-3 to pull-off a miracle and advance to the quarters. Another great day of competition, and this final week is sure to be exciting as heck!

    Yes, this is the White Olympics, and the caste clowns can all go and **** themselves if they can't handle world-class white athletes performing at their best.

    And how about Team USA, leading the medal count over powerhouse Germany? [​IMG]

    On another note, now that I'm more racially aware, I wish I'd spend more time following some of the previous Winter Olympics. Whenever there's a reference to Turin, Salt Lake City, or Nagano, I barely remember any of it. But I've followed this one very closely, and will do so in the future no doubt. If anyone wants to see some legit athleticism, watch some Alpine skiing, speed-skating, hockey, or any of the nordic events, just some of the ones that clearly stand out as impressive displays of speed, strength, agility, conditioning, and overall athletic ability.

    It sure as hell beats watching worthless overweight turds like Casey Hampton, Albert Haynseworth, Vince Wolfork and many others play a down or 2, and then rush to the sidelines and grab their oxygen masks, lest they pass out because they are woefully out of shape. [​IMG]
     
  2. guest301

    guest301 Hall of Famer

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    Foobar75. I just wanted to say I enjoyed reading that post. Glad to see you hooked on the Winter Olympics or the White Olympics, whichever you prefer. [​IMG]
     
  3. Riddlewire

    Riddlewire Master

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    I suspect that Ice Dancing isn't really on the radar of most CF members.
    Nonetheless, I have to say that that will be known forever as the Great Ice Robbery. It was the most heinous overscoring of a Canadian ice skater(s) since Brian Orser in the '88 Calgary games. The scores for Virtue and Moir were so overinflated that even Moir thought they were laughable.
    There's no racial issue here, so congratulations to all the winners (even those dirty Canucks).
     
  4. foobar75

    foobar75 Master

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    Hehe, I think I got a little carried away there. [​IMG]

    Proper credit needs to be given to East Asians (particularly the South Koreans and Chinese) who have done a respectable job thus far.

    But as someone indicated earlier, 88% of the medals have been won by white athletes, with a whole lot more to come.
     
  5. Observer

    Observer Mentor

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    Props to speedskater Davis, also. I would not have thought that a West African-descent person would have had the lung capacity to be competitive in an event that runs for almost two minutes (the 1500). However, like most American "blacks", I would suppose that he is actually mixed.
     
  6. Westside

    Westside Hall of Famer

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    I think the ice skaters both men and women are incredible athelets. I never tire seeing the perfect phyisics of the great looking white women. To me, its one of the highlights!
     
  7. DixieDestroyer

    DixieDestroyer Hall of Famer

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    I never cared to watch ice skating (probably due to being a Southern-Fried redneck [​IMG] ); however, they are indeed outstanding athletes!

    The winter olympic events I'll (usually watch) some of include....men's hockey, Alpine skiing, Biathlon, Nordic Combined & ski jumping. I guess I prefer the more physical sports...MMA, K1, boxing, football, wrestling, rodeo, pro "wrasslin" (& good ol' boy stuff like Monster Jam)![​IMG] Edited by: DixieDestroyer
     
  8. SteveB

    SteveB Mentor

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    I'm in love with the US Women's Alpine Team. Lindsey Vonn and Julia Mancuso, what's not to like?
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  9. son_of_Radovan

    son_of_Radovan Newbie

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    Slovenija gives the US women stiff [​IMG]competition...

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Tina Maze, 2x Silver Medalist 2010 - Super G and Giant Slalom
     
  10. Deadlift

    Deadlift Hall of Famer

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  11. Don Wassall

    Don Wassall Administrator Staff Member

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    Good article (and by a black writer). Having the U.S. andCanada dominate the Games was a boon for hockey and every other sport the U.S. was competitive in. That can hardly be a bad thing for White athletes given that the U.S.team was95 percent White, 4.90 Asian, and 0.10 percent black. [​IMG]

    Winter Games are relevant again

    VANCOUVER, British Columbia -- If you look at it by the raw numbers, the conclusion should be obvious that the Winter Olympics are back as a major event. The United States won gold in bobsled for the first time since 1948. The U.S. ski team won eight Alpine medals, its most ever. The U.S. won gold and silver in the European-dominated Nordic combined for the first time ever. The Americans won 37 medals, the most of any country in any single Winter Games.









    The numbers make it easy, but relying on something as temporary and impersonal as statistics is a colossal mistake, the same as suggesting baseball didn't have a drug problem simply because people still bought tickets.








    No, you have to go deeper than the numbers, down to the soul of why people watch sports, and what it is about those rare instances on the ice or on the field that can unify a country, even briefly.


    Sunday's gold-medal game between the United States and Canada was one of those moments when non-sports fans, non-hockey fans, were drawn to the event not because they were dying to find out whether Ryan Getzlaf's size could neutralize Zach Parise's speed, but because by the time the game was to be played, the Olympics had arrived at a place it had not in many years: at the middle of the national conversation.


    In the 200-channel, 24/7 universe, these large-scale connecting moments are in short supply, whether in sport or popular culture. For every fanatic who watched "The Wire," convinced it was the greatest show American television has ever produced (it is), there were millions more who were watching "Survivor," or have never seen the show.








    The days of the entire nation watching the final episode of "M*A*S*H" in unison is a thing of the past. Too many channels with too little time -- in the land of the DVR and tape delay -- make it difficult for any single event to gain the kind of traction at the watercooler the Olympics once enjoyed.








    The change in the television dynamic is only part of it. The other part is the watercooler itself. In a world of downsizing and layoffs and home offices, even the office may not be as easily unified by popular culture as it once was.








    But somehow over the past two and a half weeks, America came together over an event that seemed to have lost a fair amount of its punch. The death of Georgian luger Nodar Kumaritashvili hours before the opening ceremonies left the Games hollow. Entering the Games, even the athletes talked about the seeming lack of interest from the American audience. The Winter Olympics were thought to be too distant, the sports too European without a history of American success.








    Two things happened, though. The first: American stars elevated their sports.








    The men's hockey team was great. Less than two hours after losing the gold-medal game to Canada, American forward Patrick Kane said he was already thinking about Sochi in 2014 "for revenge." Lindsey Vonn entered the Games as a star and left a bigger one. Bode Miller arrived in Vancouver aloof but emerged redeemed. Shaun White and Apolo Ohno were spectacular, adding a measure of electricity to a Games that bordered on the staid.








    The second: The Winter Olympics, once the foreign province of Europe, became the North American Games. The backdrop of Vancouver gave the Games a special feel. The American medal haul was a record, but so too was the 14 gold medals collected by host country Canada.








    The Americans and Canadians fought each other for the top of the podium, even in sports in which neither had been an overwhelming favorite -- women's bobsled, skeleton and speedskating, for example. Germany earned its luge medals, but both the U.S. and Canada took spots on the podium in bobsled, including a spectacular performance by the U.S. men in the four-man competition and the Canadian women.








    Tremendous battles were fought. In women's hockey, Canada, the United States and Finland won medals, in that order. The United States and Canada were the face of hockey, the biggest team sport of the Games, culminating with the men's gold-medal game. The Olympics would have taken on a decidedly different view if the gold-medal game had been played between the Czech Republic and Sweden. And if you're NHL commissioner Gary Bettman, your worst nightmare just came true. The NHL could not have done for the sport of hockey what Sunday's gold-medal game did, and if the league prohibits players from participating in the Games, it will undermine the sport.


    Buzz is one thing, and people were certainly talking about the Olympics, but the residual effect of these Games will be felt in recruiting when it comes time for elite-level kids across the country to take an interest in sports. One of the measures of the U.S. success in these Games will be based on the quality of athletes who now gravitate toward skiing, bobsled, luge, men's and women's hockey and, yes, even Nordic combined.


    The Games are over. The torch has been passed from Vancouver to Sochi, with old- and new-school Russian hockey legends Vladislav Tretiak and Alex Ovechkin dancing with young kids at the closing ceremonies Sunday night, and they left something surprising and memorable -- the best combination of all.








    Vancouver gave people something to talk about. They are talking today, and will be talking tomorrow. And that is how it should be, because sports only live longest in the imagination.








    Howard Bryant is a senior writer for ESPN.com. He is the author of "Shut Out: A Story of Race and Baseball in Boston " and "Juicing the Game: Drugs, Power and the Fight for the Soul of Major League Baseball." He can be reached at Howard.Bryant@espn3.com. http://sports.espn.go.com/olympics/winter/2010/columns/story?columnist=bryant_howard&id=4955287
    <DIV id=sponsored style="MARGIN: 20px 30px 0px">Edited by: Don Wassall
     
  12. guest301

    guest301 Hall of Famer

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    Outstanding article, solid points throughout.
     
  13. screamingeagle

    screamingeagle Mentor

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    I haven't following the news, lately. Has President Obama invided any members of the US olympic team to the White House?
     

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