Harrison under investigation

Discussion in 'Indianapolis Colts' started by Poacher, May 2, 2008.

  1. Poacher

    Poacher Mentor

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  2. Don Wassall

    Don Wassall Administrator Staff Member

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    Gives new meaning to the football term "run and shoot."


    Which highly venerated black will be next to go off the deep end? Romeo Crennel? Tyrone Willingham? Barry Sanders?
     
  3. sport historian

    sport historian Master

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    This doesn't look like IT, but something has often occured to me. Any large city has the potential of having another O.J. Simpson fiasco. All it takes is for another Great Sports Hero blow up is a rage (which is what Simpson did) and kill somebody. It would play out the same way and would end with bewildered white people wringing their hands at the chasm between the races.
     
  4. Don Wassall

    Don Wassall Administrator Staff Member

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    If it was Roger Clemens or some other prominent white athlete under investigation for shooting someone, it would far and away be the major "sports" story being covered, rather than being buried among other headlines as is the case with Harrison.

    Harrison was always extolled as this great person, mainly because he didn't celebrate his big plays. But he's always seemed freakish to me. Sitting on the sideline away from all his other teammates, almost never speaking or showing any emotion whatsoever other than occasionally pouting through his body language when he wanted the ball more. More ominously, there was the time a few years ago when a 13-year-old boy accused Harrison of choking him when he asked him for an autograph at the Pro Bowl in Hawaii. Apparently Marvin is more of a ticking time bomb than a stoic.
     
  5. GiovaniMarcon

    GiovaniMarcon Mentor

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    Hmmm... Odd that I had to come to this website to first hear of this story, where as back in 1996 you had to be living under a rock or on some other planet to not hear about what a racist redneck slab of white trash John Rocker was.

    Seems to me that shooting someone is a lot worse than telling some reporter your opinions, extreme though they might be.

    If Harrison did commit this shooting, though, it's only a matter of time before the media turns it around and makes it the white man's fault -- in this case, because the white man and white society uses and abuses blacks and that's why they (blacks) sometimes lash out.

    The man done ruined another good brother, true that.

    [/sarcasm]

    Remember Michael Vick and the media accusations of white racism and persecution, and the allegations that "white folk just don't understand" the way black people view life, dogs, and each other? And how it was white people's fault for the lack of communication?

    It's like we're in the Twilight Zone and people on some other planet are laughing at us.
     
  6. Capt. Larsen

    Capt. Larsen Newbie

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    Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't this the same boon, that in 2005, was sued for attacking some White kids who asked for his autograph?
     
  7. Van_Slyke_CF

    Van_Slyke_CF Mentor

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    The ballistics report says that the bullet casings found by the police after the shooting came from a gun owned by Marvin Harrison. So, who did the shooting? Harrison? Or a member of his posse?

    The NFL and black players committing crimes. It`s endless.
     
  8. Don Wassall

    Don Wassall Administrator Staff Member

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    This incident has been completely forgotten by the media, and why not? Why would anyone, including apparently the police, have any interest in whether or not a famous NFL player was responsible for shooting someone when it was his gun that was used and the player admitted getting into a fight with the victim right before he was shot?


    Alleged victim in North Philly shooting sues Harrison


    Indianapolis Colts wide receiver Marvin Harrison has not been charged in an April 29 shooting in North Philadelphia, allegedly committed with a gun licensed to him, and a police investigation into the incident remains open. But the alleged victim isn't waiting for the criminal justice system to decide what charges, if any, Harrison should face before seeking his day in court.


    The alleged victim, Dwight Dixon, has filed a civil suit against Harrison, claiming that he suffered "serious and permanent injuries ... and a severe shock to his nerves and nervous system" as a result of the shooting, which wounded his left hand, according to the Philadelphia Daily News.





    While Harrison acknowledged to city police detectives that he had been in a fight with Dixon prior to the shooting, he insisted that he had nothing to do with the shooting, sources said, according to the report.





    Harrison's attorney, Daniel J. Hart, and his agent, Tom Condon, did not return calls seeking comment, according to the Daily News.





    The Colts declined comment on the lawsuit Wednesday.





    The lawsuit, filed last month, seeks $100,000 in damages -- and seems designed to go forward regardless of whether Harrison is charged. According to the Daily News, one section of the lawsuit reads: "The defendant intentionally and outrageously shot the plaintiff," and another section of the complaint claims Dixon was shot by someone else using Harrison's gun.





    "Look, it's our position that Marvin Harrison was the shooter," said Dixon's attorney, Robert M. Gamburg, according to the Daily News. "But even if you believe the other theory, Marvin's gun was still used in the shooting, so he was negligent for leaving the weapon where someone else could obtain it."





    According to the Daily News, sources said Harrison and Dixon had been squabbling for two weeks prior to the shooting, following a disagreement between the two men at Playmakers, a North Philadelphia bar that Harrison owns. Ballistics tests determined that shell casings found at the scene of the shooting matched Harrison's Belgian-made handgun.





    Witnesses and Dixon separately identified Harrison as the shooter, sources said, according to the Daily News.





    Under Pennsylvania law, Harrison could face misdemeanor charges if police determine his gun was used in the commission of a crime.





    ESPN.com NFL writer Paul Kuharsky contributed to this report.


    http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=3631911
     
  9. Jimmy Chitwood

    Jimmy Chitwood Hall of Famer

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    let's see, 1) we have harrison involved in a physical altercation with the victim. 2) we have ballistic evidence that matches harrison's gun to the scene of the crime. 3) said firearm was found in harrison's car. 4) harrison admits to having a confrontation with the man.

    nope, there's nothing to see here. no reason whatsoever to think harrison was involved in the shooting, or even that a shooting took place! pay no attention to the man behind the curtain. [​IMG]
     
  10. jaxvid

    jaxvid Hall of Famer

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    Not just that, but: "Witnesses and Dixon separately identified Harrison as the shooter, sources said, according to the Daily News. "


    Usually when witnesses identify someone as the "shooter" they end up in jail awaiting trial.
     
  11. Thrashen

    Thrashen Hall of Famer

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    "Usually when witnesses identify someone as the "shooter" they end up in jail awaiting trial."


    Usually, haha. The term "usually" would only apply if the criminal was a white man (especially if the victim were black).

    But if that were the case, Chris Berman, Trey Wingo, Rich Eisen, and the rest of the transvestites as ESPN would have already ordered the police to put the cuffs on his wrists.

    This Harrison story is the same old hilarious tale we've been hearing for decades. Did anyone notice the Gayman Jones got into trouble again? I wonder if Goodell will finally ban this little turd for life. Na.Edited by: Thrashen
     
  12. Don Wassall

    Don Wassall Administrator Staff Member

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    Nobody wants to pursue it in the media because Harrison is always cited when the discussion is affletes who don't act likeattention-starved morons every time they make a half-decent play. He's supposed to be one of the league's "good guys" -- but also not mentioned is the incident at the Pro Bowl a few years back when Harrison allegedly began choking a 13 year old boy who asked him for an autograph. Then there's the strange bird who usually sits alone on the bench when the Colts defense is on the field, and who rarely talks to teammates or anyone else. Harrison's a weirdo, but at this late stage of his career the Caste media wants to see him leave the league as "Dignified Marvin" not as Weird Criminally Prone Marvin who may have shot a man.
     
  13. Kaptain

    Kaptain Master

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    Harrison is still stinking it up on the field. What a whiny baby. Both him and Wayne seem to have perpetual whine-look on their face as they saunter slowly back to the huddle or sit with sulking faces on the sidelines. It's obvious to me that Gonzalez has been ignored in the offense the last few games because the black clowns started whining again.
     
  14. Thrashen

    Thrashen Hall of Famer

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    I actually think that Reggie Wayne is one the NFL's "Good Guys," whatever that is. He doesnt seem very cocky or showy, both of which I despise. I also think Wayne is one of the handful of ligitimate #1 black WRs in the NFL.

    Harrison has always been a bug-eyed nut-job that the NFL media always portrays as a "good sport" and a "nice, quiet guy." I guess they forgot about the time he pummeled a young kid that wanted his autograph....and obviously, the most recent "police investigation" (which was covered for 5 full seconds on ESPN).

    Harrison looks even crappier than usual this year....and this is most likely his last year on the Colts, and hopefully the NFL.
     
  15. Don Wassall

    Don Wassall Administrator Staff Member

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    A white writer and some DWFs (see comments below article) can no longer hero-worship the weird, washed-up, alligator-armed, alleged trigger manMarvin Harrison:


    From hero to fraud, Colts' Harrison makes ugly 180


    Grab a gravestone and start chiseling, because we have a date of death:


    Here lies the Benefit of the Doubt for Marvin Harrison.


    It expired on Nov. 9, 2008. The official time of death is difficult to determine, because Harrison killed off any final shred of our goodwill -- my goodwill, anyway -- in two different moments Sunday at Pittsburgh, where the Colts won 24-20 in spite of him.


    Yes, in spite of him. The Colts now win games in spite of their Hall of Fame receiver.


    The first moment came late in the first half. First down, midfield. Harrison is running free deep, some sort of post route, and Peyton Manning puts the ball almost on the money. Almost, but not quite. Hey, Manning did his best. There were more than 1,000 pounds of muscular Steelers trying to bash in his head when he put the ball within 2 feet of Harrison, nearly 40 yards down the field.


    Harrison couldn't be bothered to catch it.


    The pass wasn't perfect, but the effort was nonexistent. Harrison simply didn't try. The ball was about one-half stride ahead of him, coming in at knee level, and Harrison's reaction wasn't to dive or slide or even bend at the waist and reach with both hands. No, his reaction was to stick out a single hand.


    If the ball was cloth and his hand Velcro, Harrison might have controlled it. As it was, a hurtling football had no chance of sticking, and it fell incomplete. After the game Manning took the blame, saying the pass had to be better. Immediately after the throw, his body language said something else: As Harrison merely waved at the ball, Manning's entire body convulsed. His knees buckled. His face contorted. He was pissed.


    And for Harrison, that was the better of the two moments.


    The second moment came in the third quarter. Unlike the first moment, described earlier, Harrison didn't look indifferent. No, this time he looked scared.


    It was third-and-3 from the Steelers' 18. Harrison, heading for the end zone's right pylon, got behind cornerback William Gay. Manning delivered a perfect pass at the goal line. Harrison actually made an attempt this time, leaving his feet and going low for the catch, but at that moment Steelers safety Tyrone Carter was arriving. Harrison abandoned his pursuit of the ball, letting it drop, and went into self-preservation mode. Carter delivered a glancing blow, but the pass was already incomplete.


    Harrison stayed down. Team officials walked him off the field, then announced he had a mild concussion and said his return was questionable.


    On the first play of the Colts' very next possession, Harrison was on the field.


    He's a hero!


    Nah. He's a fraud.


    I'm sorry, but the benefit of the doubt is gone. Nothing about Marvin Harrison is what I once thought it to be.


    Once upon a time, Marvin Harrison was the peculiarly shy, introverted receiver who worked hard and put up great numbers. He was a star, and more. He was a role model. We didn't know much about him, but he had earned the benefit of the doubt.


    Now, the benefit of doubt is gone. Now, in light of a horrific event this past spring in Philadelphia, where Harrison has been linked to -- but not charged with -- a shooting near an auto shop he owns, I'm not sure shy is the word to describe him. His gun was allegedly used to shoot a man Harrison had been fighting with weeks earlier. The victim has accused Harrison of pulling the trigger, and has even filed a civil law suit. No resolution is in sight, but in light of the events in Philadelphia, Harrison seems less shy, and possibly something more sinister.


    Now when I watch Marvin Harrison on the sideline, I don't see peculiar. I see petulance. I see the Colts' skill players huddled around Manning, and I see Harrison -- who is having his worst season as a pro -- sitting by himself, 30 yards away. I watch this happen last week at home against the Patriots, and again Sunday at Pittsburgh, and I wonder if Harrison has more in common with Terrell Owens than we'd suspected.


    But that's not fair to Terrell Owens, because T.O. would have done his damndest to make that catch in the second quarter on Sunday, and he wouldn't have been spooked into alligator-arming that drop in the end zone in the third quarter.


    Terrell Owens can be a baby and even a jerk, but he's neither indifferent nor scared when the football comes his way. And he's never been accused of shooting a man.


    Marvin Harrison? We don't know Marvin Harrison. Or at least, we didn't know him a few years ago. Maybe we're starting to know him now.


    I liked him better when I didn't know him at all.


    http://www.sportsline.com/columns/story/11098276/rss
     
  16. White Shogun

    White Shogun Hall of Famer

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    Wow. Blistering article. The times they are changin'.
     
  17. Don Wassall

    Don Wassall Administrator Staff Member

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    There's a pretty damning story on Harrison in the current ESPN The Magazine. Like so many black athletes he lives a charmed life when it comes to the media and the legal system. Some excerpts:


    "As dusk falls in North Philly, armies of hoodies appear on West Thompson Street, their faces framed by shadows. This part of town hasn't been remade by real estate speculators. Vacant lots are strewn with crumbling bricks. A speakeasy runs out of a basement. . . Sidewalk dice games go on all night.


    "Dwight Dixon, a 5'11", 280 pound ex-convict with a big mouth, is a magnet for the kind of trouble that keeps so many buildings boarded up around here. On April 29, 2008, he was standing outside a take-out joint on the corner of West Thompson and North 25th streets when it found him again. Two weeks earlier, at a local bar called Playmakers [owned by Harrison], he'd gotten into a beef with a man he'd known since childhood. Now here that man was, right beside Dixon, wanting to collect an apology. Within seconds, the two were jawing, then trading kicks and punches. 'I was getting my ass kicked,' Dixon says.


    "Even after onlookers broke up the brawl, Dixon was hot. He jumped into his Toyota truck and jammed it into reverse, driving the wrong way up West Thompson as he shouted, 'You just think you can go 'round doing what you want to people?'


    "After Dixon stopped his truck in front of Chuckie's Garage [owned by Harrison]to argue further with the man, a shot rang out and a bullet ripped through his hand as it grasped the steering wheel. 'Bullets were flying past my head, all over the car,' Dixon says. One shattered his rear window. Another went through his jeans, just missing his leg. Others sailed down the street, shattering the windows of a Mercury sedan with a 2-year-old boy and his father inside. A bystander was struck in the back.


    "Dixon sped away on blown-out tires. In the rearview, he says, he saw the man who he claims shot him, Marvin Harrison, giving chase, running every bit as hard as you'd figure a future Pro Football Hall of Famer could run. . .


    "Before Super Bowl XLI, reporters asked Peyton Manning about his receiver's reticence. The QB said he didn't know Harrison well until he visited him in Philly one off-season. 'There's a Marvin in Philly and a Marvin in Indianapolis,' he said. Even around his teammates, the Indy Marvin barely says a word.


    "To be fair, Harrison owes fans and teammates nothing beyond his best efforts on the field. But the more he leaves blank, the more we fill in. He flashes no bling, no gold teeth. There are no Sharpies and no whining. What products does he endorse? Who is he dating? We have no idea, so we ascribe to him the qualities he shows in games and of those around him -- the earnest indefatigability of Manning, the quiet strength of Dungy. For fans, this trio personifies old school virtues: the Colts as color-blind, hardworking winners.


    "But that, as it happens, may say more about us than about No. 88. . .


    "In all, Harrison owns 20 North Philly properties, many clustered around the block where he once lived. . .


    "On Jan. 4, 2003, before kickoff of an AFC wildcard game at the Meadowlands, Harrison was catching passes from Manning as Jets ballboys shagged punts from New York's Matt Turk. One of them, a 23-year-old Long Islander named Matt Prior, threw a ball downfield that bounced near Harrison. According to a New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority report -- and two people on the field -- No. 88 felt the toss violated his personal space. He charged Prior, bumping him in the chest.


    "'You threw the ball at me!' Harrison screamed. 'You're a professional! You should do your job better than that!' Everyone on the field froze. Prior asked Harrison to back away. Instead, Harrison grabbed Prior by the throat and lifted him off the ground. While fans watching on the stadium's video screen cheered for their ballboy to fight back, players and workers tried to separate the two. As Harrison argued with security, Prior was taken to a medical station, where marks were found around his neck. 'This was a violent incident,' says Dan Santos, security manager at the Meadowlands that day. 'Coaches tried to downplay it, but we were one step from making an arrest.' In the end, though, Prior decided not to press charges; he just wanted an apology he never got. The NJSEA referred the incident to state police, who didn't pursue it.


    "That wasn't the only time Harrison drew looks from law enforcement. On the evening of Feb. 10, 2005, three nights before the Pro Bowl, he and two men were walking along a row of stores at the Hilton Hawaiian Village hotel in Honolulu. According to a police report -- and a witness -- Harrison was talking on his cell when a group of teenage fansasked for his autograph. Harrison declined, and when the fans kept pestering him, he and his friends turned on them. The Pro Bowler took a swing at one fan, then grabbed him by the throat and put an arm around his neck. After more scuffling, Harrison and his friends ran off, leaving one of the teenagers beaten. 'I was walking about three feet behind these kids,' the witness told ESPN The Magazine. 'Harrison and his friends acted like real punks.'


    "Despite the police report, Honolulu's prosecuting attorney didn't press charges. 'We couldn't prove them beyond a reasonable doubt,' says deputy prosecutor Renee Sonobe Hong. And once again, hardly anyone took notice.. .


    "[Besides Dixon's account], Robert Nixon, the bystander shot in his back that day (the bullet remains in his shoulder), apparently had no issue with talking to the cops. According to a police source, Nixon told detectives that he saw Harrison with a gun in his hand during the fight with Dixon. And while other elements of his story occasionally varied, police believed his account enough to place him in protective custody for two weeks after he came forward.


    "Still, on Jan. 6, Philadelphia district attorney Lynne Abraham announced that her office won't be bringing charges against Harrison at this time. 'I'm pretty comfortable I know who fired the gun,' Abraham said, but later explained, 'I have to prove a case. With these witnesses, I don't think so.'


    "In the end, the seeming contradiction between Harrison's statments about his gun and ballistics tests placing the gun at the scene were not enough for Abraham to move forward. So Harrison can sit back in his beach chair on West Thompson Street and keep watch on his block.


    "Meanwhile, around the Philly courthouse, the case still has buzz. 'What do you think about the Harrison case?' a clerk recently asked a cop in the case. The officer did not hesitate to answer. 'Looks like Marvin caught another pass.'"Edited by: Don Wassall
     
  18. Tom Iron

    Tom Iron Mentor

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    Harrison is just another poor slob slipping and sliding towards his date with death or prison. Whether it's before or after the close of his playing days is irreli-vent. These guys think they've got the world by the short h*irs, but it's the other way around. They're just being fed all the rope they need to hang themselves and when it finally happens, they're the most surprised people in the world.

    Tom Iron...
     
  19. Bart

    Bart Hall of Famer

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    Harrison should have been taken into custody long ago.So, Lynn Abraham isn't bringing charges at this time. What is she waiting for?Isn't this the same judge who threw a bunch of peaceful Christian protesters in the slammer a year or two ago?
     
  20. Don Wassall

    Don Wassall Administrator Staff Member

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    Matt Jones drinks a few beers and becomes America's Public Enemy Number One. Marvin Harrison (allegedly)chokes 13 year old fans and (allegedly) shoots people at will, and gets a pass from the "justice" system, the media,and the DWFs. No disparity there whatsover, move along, there's nothing to see. . .

    Man claims Harrison shot him

    In the suit, Robert Nixon, 33, claims he saw Harrison shoot at another man with guns in each of his hands on April 29, 2008, and continue to fire when the target fled the scene in his car. He said Harrison "continued shooting at the other person ... as [he] drove past plaintiff. In doing so, a bullet from defendant's handgun struck plaintiff in the back with great force and violence."



    The seven-count suit alleges assault, battery negligence and reckless misconduct.


    It is the second suit against Harrison in connection with the shooting on West Thompson Street, where Harrison owns a car wash and garage. The man he allegedly fired on, Dwight Dixon, filed a suit last year that accused Harrison of retaliating for a shouting match that turned physical when the two traded punches. Dixon claimed he was shot "intentionally" and "outrageously."
    full article: http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=4359721
     

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