Great players I watched when growing up

Discussion in 'Baseball' started by Charles Martel, Jan 18, 2020.

  1. Charles Martel

    Charles Martel Hall of Famer

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  2. Charles Martel

    Charles Martel Hall of Famer

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  3. sport historian

    sport historian Master

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    The Brooks Robinson photo (looks like a trading card picture) was taken in Yankee Stadium circa 1963. The Frank Howard photo (in a LA Dodger uniform) is from the same period, taken at the Polo Ground where the Mets were playing. The Polo Grounds were torn down after the 1963 season when the Mets moved to Shea Stadium.
     
  4. Don Wassall

    Don Wassall Administrator Staff Member

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    Still the most popular and beloved baseball player of all time after Babe Ruth (and maybe Joe DiMaggio), as anyone who has ever seriously collected baseball cards knows. Mickey Mantle was my idol as youngster.

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    Last edited: Jan 20, 2020
  5. sport historian

    sport historian Master

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    Mickey Mantle was the biggest sports star of his time. And a bigger star in his time than anyone since. Mantle was of the early TV era, DiMaggio retired after the 1951 season, before every house had a TV.
     
  6. Flint

    Flint Mentor Staff Member

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    That’s a young picture of Howard. I remember him looking much different later on. He closed his career out in Detroit 50+ pounds heavier and with glasses. Those earlier years in the Polo Grounds and than Chavez Ravine cost him a lot of career HR’s.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2020
  7. Don Wassall

    Don Wassall Administrator Staff Member

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    Mike Schmidt was the best ever all-around third baseman -- 10 Gold Gloves, 8 home run titles, as many as 29 stolen bases in a season, 12 All Star games among many other accomplishments. He comes to mind because I was browsing the magazines at the grocery store the other day and he's on the cover of the current Sports Collectors Digest. Usually when you haven't seen a picture of someone for a long time there's initial shock until you adjust to how much older they've gotten, but they're still recognizable. But I would never recognize Schmidt today just seeing a picture without knowing who it was. He's 70 now and still looks quite fit, but I just don't recognize his face at that age.

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    Last edited: Jan 22, 2020
  8. Charles Martel

    Charles Martel Hall of Famer

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    Don Drysdale

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    Steve Carlton

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    Dennis McLain
    (of questionable character, but a great pitcher)

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  9. Don Wassall

    Don Wassall Administrator Staff Member

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    Al Kaline, 1934-2020

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  10. Don Wassall

    Don Wassall Administrator Staff Member

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    I met someone the other day whose last name is MacDowell. Living in Pittsburgh, I immediately thought of Sam McDowell, a fireballer from the 1960s and '70s who grew up in Pittsburgh but played mostly for the Indians. He's one of the few pitchers to average a strikeout an inning during his career and led the AL in strikeouts five times in six years from 1965 through 1970. His league leading K totals were 325, 225, 283, 279 and 304, very impressive in any era. But he was brought along slowly and his stats before those peak years were unimpressive, and as I recall injuries shortened his career as he ended up with a so-so 141-134 won-loss mark. Like Nolan Ryan, and Sandy Koufax and Randy Johnson in their early years, McDowell had a difficult time harnessing his incredible power.

    Sam McDowell was not an all-time great but he had an all-time great fastball. And for a time he was Cleveland's answer to the great Bob Feller:

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  11. Kaptain

    Kaptain Master

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    And he's racist! Lol. After reading this post I looked up what he looks like today and found this article: https://www.crossingbroad.com/2017/06/mike-schmidt-is-more-of-a-bigot-than-you-thought.html
    In the photo of him in the article he looks good and I think recognizable, but I can see how most photos he for some strange reason isn't even though he remains fit - maybe it's just the white hair and no ball cap? The article if you don't want to waste time is claiming Schmidt is a bigot because he didn't think some Hispanic player on the Phillies could be a leader because of the language barrier. God forbid communication skills be considered in leadership roles.
     
  12. Charles Martel

    Charles Martel Hall of Famer

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    Ken Harrelson led the AL in RBIs in 1968.

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  13. Charles Martel

    Charles Martel Hall of Famer

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    Norm Cash was AL batting champion in 1961 with a .361 batting average.

    In the 1968 World Series, Cash hit .385 (10-26). With two out in the seventh inning of Game 7, Cash singled to start a three-run rally that broke a scoreless tie and propelled the team to its World Series title since 1945.

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