Great Goal Thread

Discussion in 'Soccer' started by Europe, May 16, 2010.

  1. Europe

    Europe Mentor

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    The problem is that the good footballers are being overlooked for the "athletes" like SWP and Walcott.I heard Chris Waddle say that the smaller skilled players should be given a chance,but it seems like the black players are being given the chance at a young age. Rooney,J Cole, Adam Johnson are true footballers with great skill,but 2 have a difficult time cracking the England lineup. Adam Johnson should be a regular starter now. There is something seriously wrong when SWP is picked ahead of J Cole. What do you think about J Cole starting in place of Defore up front? He should be on the bench at minimum with Milner and Johnson starting. At this point I would also put Walcott on the bench.
    Milner is also excellent with his tackiling and crossing.
    Why does A Cole automatically get a start? I would like to see Warnock get a chance. A Cole isn't super fast and his skills are only ok.

    I think the academies aren't taking the skill away so much as favoring the faster and or bigger, less skilled player. Players like Walcott,SWp and Ashley Young make up for their mediorce skills with speed. Walcott is the best of those 3.
     
  2. Rebajlo

    Rebajlo Mentor

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    The fact that these academies favour the faster or bigger players means that, by default, they are generallyweeding out the more inventive and, therefore, skilled players. The undoubted emphasis on speed and rigid tactics is glaringly obvious - kids are being placed in the "system" from an earlier and earlier age, where the importance of the aforementioned qualities is hammered into them, to the detriment of technical progression.The coaches are looking for the human material which is conducive to their machine-like, "safety first" tactics, where flair and inventiveness is generally frowned upon as constituting "risky" play. Classic dribbling and passing merchants arevery few and far between- that's why the "old" matches are a lot more interesting to watch.

    As things go, the emphasis on fast but relatively quite unskilled players naturally has an effect upon the evolution of the game as a whole, for both kids and adults mimic what they see on TV. The local junior football training session attempts to createyoung players in the image of the current crop of professionals - for every kid who wants to imitatethe traditional skilled approach of Cristiano Ronaldo or Lionel Messithere shall be a hundred who'd rather just plough on with the simple sprinting and square passing of their black heroes who clutter their TV screens. After all, it's much easier and, according to the "prevailing school of thought", much more effective. Unlike in past eras, the more skilled player is not alwaysatthe top of the pick list, which is evidenced by the Englishmodel.

    Anyway, let's continue with the goals... [​IMG]

    TREVOR BROOKING (England) vs Hungary - 1981, World Cup Qualifier:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tf5aLJLP-vw



    Edited by: Rebajlo
     
  3. Europe

    Europe Mentor

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    Trevor Brooking is the head of player developement. And here is a quote from an article about him:

    "This week he launches a document, The Future Game, articulating a vision of how football should be played and coached. It outlines a dream that English footballers, from the grass roots to the national team, would be taught to play possession football in the mould of the Dutch, Spanish or Brazilians, and for creativity rather than conformity to thrive.

    It is noble aspiration, even if delivery through the structure of English football, riven by short-term vested interests, will be furiously difficult.

    Even arriving at this point has driven Brooking to the brink of resignation from his post which he took up in 2004, such is the entrenched conservatism and factionalism of the game, in which everyone from Premier League chairmen to the dad who coaches his son's Under-8s insist they know best.



    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/wo...its-I-nearly-quit-FA-times.html#ixzz0z0949eKu

    If coaches like Ferguson,Wenger wanted to train their academy players the way they wanted, wouldn't they be able to? WEnger always complains about lack of skill from English players,but he doesn't sign any of the skilled ones. He signs foreign black players who aren't that skilled-Eboue ring a bell.If you looked at the white players that played for England a few days ago,they are as skilled as any other players. I don't see that much difference from the Germans. Everybody talks about Spain,but they just started to win a few tournaments. They weren't dominating anything in the past.Even Brazil is way overrated. All England has to do is nuture and choose their skilled players and don't go for the faster black kid at 17 years old.

    I was watching England u21 and they were half black. It' s pathetic. All the people in Colchester rooting for an English team that doesn't represent them. But,then again, in America, we have 90,000 white people cheering for a 75% black Alabama or Georgia team.

    Not only do we have to watch black "Englishman" in England,we are subjected to assortment of Africans from every country down there.
    These Africans are not that skilled. Don't people see that?
     
  4. Rebajlo

    Rebajlo Mentor

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    Apparently not [​IMG]. Check out these astonishing statements from Sepp Blatter, FIFA's high-priest of anti-football, a position which is apparently only open to old, prune-faced, leftist anti-White eunuchs.




    "Blatter stressed that Spain's triumph was well-deserved and he also praised the quality of Argentina, Germany and Ghana: "For several World Cups now, we've been expecting a new champion to emerge. There was an element of hope that the champion would come from a continent that hadn't produced a winner before. South Korea came very close for Asia in 2002, while this time around, a couple of centimetres were the difference between Ghana making the semi-final and being eliminated.


    "That said, Spain's success was well-deserved; in my opinion, they along with Argentina produced the highest quality of play. On top of that, they're both young teams, just like the German side that finished third, and Ghana. That's a good sign.'' "
    Source: http://soccernet.espn.go.com/news/story?id=821545&sec=global&cc=3436

    Good stuff, isn't it? [​IMG]If one had not actually watched the tournament, one would be led to believe that Ghana were one of the top sides. When the flabby nonce states that there was "an element of hope that the championwould comefrom a continent that hadn't produced a winner before"he sure as hell wasn't talking about Australia, New Zealand or even the United States. It's all about non-Whites, be they black or Asian, butdefinitelypreferably black African. This is the treasonous, self-loathing attitude we are up against - openly anti-White utterances at every turn (spouted, of course, by a white "man" - to use the term loosely...). Then again, what can one expect from such a patentlydysgenic specimen:

    [​IMG]

    Looks like the repulsive prick requires a bit more fibre in his football fan-funded diet...
     
  5. Rebajlo

    Rebajlo Mentor

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    Now, back to a strictly on-topic post [​IMG].


    DIEGO LATORRE (Boca Juniors) vs Independiente - Primera Division 1989/1990:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zr5yMG9OW0Y

    Argentine striker Latorre was a potential mega-star. He formed a short-lived partnership with Gabriel Batistuta at Boca Juniors and was the first in a long list of players to be dubbed "the new Maradona". Both players were purchased by Fiorentina, but while Batistuta went on to become, in my opinion, the finest striker of the 1990s, Latorre somehow flopped and was sold off to Tenerife in Spain before moving to several more clubs and fading into obscurity...
     
  6. Europe

    Europe Mentor

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    Rebajlo, Great goal by Diego. I thought of the goal by Argentina in the 2006 WC where they had 23 passes in a row. SEE BELOW LINK.

    Blatter mentioned Argentina as playing great in 2010 WC. They did pretty well making it to the final 8,but they were crushed by Germany and got lucky against Mexico.It's funny because everyone thought England was a failure in 06 when they made it to the final 8 and lost in penalties,but this guy thought Argentina was great.

    It's a joke that all the white people in power and in the media desperately want an African team to win. These fools are already busy giving their leagues and countries away to Africans who have no business being in Europe.And don't forget the Muslims too. The West has to accomadate them.

    Blatter has to have the most cushy job out there.What the hell does he do except try to keep instant replay out. Why can't they have an official next to each goal also.This moron thinks that if they can't have instant replay in Africa,then they can't have it in England or the WC.

    If Blatter, God forbid,had to stay in anything less than a five star hotel , he would break out in hives.

    Although,I think is for limiting the amount of foreign players in each league to his credit.

    Here's the Argentina Goal--It's the 2nd goal starting at about .38Edited by: Europe
     
  7. Rebajlo

    Rebajlo Mentor

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    Europe - Blatter's comments regarding the reduction ofthe numbers of foreigners in each league is simply talk. Nothing will change without the strict enforcement of unequivocal limits, as opposed to this type of "home grown" bollocks, where "home grown" players are potentially all Africans, be they from Africa itself or from France. As I've said before, the complexion of the game won't begin to return to a more traditionally healthy state until "old style" limits are imposed. In my opinion, an absolutemaximum of three foreigners at each club, be they in the starting lineup, on the bench, or in the stands - only three. That would be a start, for the "native-born" blacks and Arabs would still pose a problem, but of course the corporatemoghuls and social engineers would have none of that [​IMG].


    Here's a goal by the "original" Diego [​IMG]

    DIEGO MARADONA (Barcelona) vs Red Star Belgrade - 1982/1983 European Cup Winner's Cup, Second Round:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_aPNKbTK0IY
     
  8. Europe

    Europe Mentor

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    "As I've said before, the complexion of the game won't begin to return to a more traditionally healthy state until "old style" limits are imposed. In my opinion, an absolute maximum of three foreigners at each club, be they in the starting lineup, on the bench, or in the stands - only three. That would be a start, for the "native-born" blacks and Arabs would still pose a problem, but of course the corporate moghuls and social engineers would have none of that . "

    I completely agree. I'll bet even Ireland, with their stupid immigration policy,will have some blacks in 10 years. Imagine when these announcers start calling these black people Irishman. It will be too much to take.
     
  9. Rebajlo

    Rebajlo Mentor

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    The Irish national team has already featured blacks - Paul McGrath debuted for Ireland back in 1985 and was a regular for the next decade, while Phil Babb demeaned the Irish shirt for several years from the mid-1990s.
     
  10. Rebajlo

    Rebajlo Mentor

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  11. Europe

    Europe Mentor

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    Even a couple of blacks in that game for England.
     
  12. Lisa D

    Lisa D Newbie

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  13. Rebajlo

    Rebajlo Mentor

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    Europe - There were three blacks in the England 1990 World Cup squad (John Barnes, Des Walker, Paul Parker). The latter two can be seen in the video.


    Lisa D - That's a sublime piece of skill by Yoann Gourcuff. It's sad (and thoroughly sickening) that a player in possession of such ability is deliberately marginalised and harassed by blacks in order to prevent him from starring for the national team. [​IMG]

    Here is a package of goals by Argentine Gabriel Batistuta, in my opinion the greatest striker of the 1990s and one of the greatest of all time. He could smash them in from all types of angles and distances, was a great header of the ball and took superb free kicks. Batistuta's technique was off the dial, as he could set himself up for net-bursting shots from seemingly innocous situations while being apparently comfortably covered by defenders. He was generally renowned for his explosive finishing but his close control was absolutely top-hole - I remember him winning a penalty against Romania in the second round of the 1994 World Cup by beating the defence with a very tight Cruyff turn. Anyway, enough talk..

    GABRIEL BATISTUTA "Spectacular Goals" package:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ojLd0QuuKks
     
  14. Highlander

    Highlander Mentor

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  15. Highlander

    Highlander Mentor

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  16. Rebajlo

    Rebajlo Mentor

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    Highlander - Nice goals [​IMG]. The combination of Dimitar Berbatov (Bulgarian) and Thomas Muller (German) brought the following free kick to mind:

    HRISTO STOICHKOV (Bulgaria) vs Germany - 1994 World Cup, Quarterfinal:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPUWoRflmNo
     
  17. Rebajlo

    Rebajlo Mentor

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  18. Europe

    Europe Mentor

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    Nice,Who needs Brazilians? I have never heard of the Welsh Cup. I'll look it up.
     
  19. Rebajlo

    Rebajlo Mentor

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    My sentiments exactly - Brazilian playersshould stay in, er , Brazil [​IMG]. I remember watching the 1982 World Cup as a kid - I was a right little football fanatic back then and can definitely tell You that the entire Brazilian squad, with the exception of Falcao and Dirceu, was Brazilian-based. Those were the days... [​IMG]

    The Welsh Cup is a regular knock-out tournament, just like the F.A. Cup, Scottish Cup, et cetera - but without the international exposure. These days, the Welsh teams which compete in the English league system, such as Cardiff City, Swansea City, and Wrexham (who are unfortunately currently in the Conference League) are ineligible to enter the Welsh Cup. This may come as a surprise, but English clubssituated close tothe Welsh borderlands were also previously allowed to participate, so the likes of Shrewsbury Town, Hereford United, and Chester City (my girlfriend's father was born in Chester [​IMG]) are actually Welsh Cup winners. The current eligibility limits date from the mid-1990s (1995/1996 to be precise).

    Now, here is a package of goals from the BBC's 1982/1983 Scottish Goal of the Season shortlist.It's the only footage I could find of:

    (a) Kenny Dalglish's goal against Belgium in the qualifiers for the 1984 European Championship (from the 2:18 mark), and

    (b) Charlie Nicholas' goal against Switzerland in the same qualifying tournament (from the 4:20 mark)

    CONTENDERS FOR THE 1982/1983 SCOTTISH GOAL OF THE SEASON COMPLIATION:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mqayD8IdVys

    There are plenty of nifty goals in the video - the "old-style" (i.e., all-White and free of commercial hype) British ambience is intoxicating...
     
  20. Europe

    Europe Mentor

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    The good old days. I don't know why some think the game is so much more exciting now.
     
  21. j41181

    j41181 Master

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    Not really into soccer, but I still understand the passion for the game. France and England of all countries have simply ruined their soccer leagues and programs. Sure, France may have won the World Cup in 1998, but only because it had several white players in the roster then. Now, France is as usual a shadow of it's former glory, it has great neglected it's native white soccer pool. It's even worse for England, like France has neglected it's native white soccer pool too, and 1966 is fast becoming a distant memory.

    Who knows how many other George Best-type prospects throughout the UK have been wasted. It's not really fun watching a game when much of players are people you just can't relate to, no matter how much multi-cultural nonsense is thrown at your face.
     
  22. Rebajlo

    Rebajlo Mentor

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    That's why I have hardly watched any clubfootball over the past decade. It's natural to wish to watch sport and films and listen to music which features people that one can relate to (i.e., same appearance, culture, language, religionand so on).Even casually seeinga non-White grates on my sensibilities - why would I wish to voluntarily watch people who have nothing in common with myself?

    When I was a little kid, the football players that I saw on television were White - they were my people. I was always outside with the ball, pretending that I was in my favourite players' shoes, replicatingevents which I had just seen -I believed that "when I grew up" maybe I could also be a world-class footballer, just like my White heroes, and in the process help my Peterborough United to win a Double (the fervid imagination of the child, eh?) [​IMG].

    I freely admit that I always hated the then-rare black players - they weren't my people, they didn't belong, and they should therefore just naff right off to their backward Africa.Even when it was still comparatively "white", I despised the Brazilian national team to the point of fanaticism, for it represented an alien culture of lurid race-mixing, irritating drum-beating and a patent lack of fair play which had no place in my "European" world. But what do the little White kids of today see? Blacks, upon blacks, upon blacks. The message: "These are your heroes. You can admire and worship them, yet you cannot emulate them, for they are black, while you are only white. Gee, don't you wish that you were black? Ah, well - bad luck, kid. Sporting and all-round physical prowess is for the black boys - the most that you can hope for is to be a wigger. Maybe you can consequently get one of the uglier girls who the "superior" blacks aren't interested in..." I can almost hear the Jews rubbing their hands in glee...

    Anyway, back to the topic. The goal below comes from last night's Europa Leaguefixture between Lech Poznan and Manchester City. Under normal circumstances, a match between an English and a Polish team would be of huge interest to me, given that I have a proverbial foot in both camps, but insteadthe "modern" game throws up a farce in which only 3 Englishmen and 3 Poles start for their respective nations' clubs and eight of the twenty two starters are black. Bollocks to that. At least this goal was scored by a genuinely Polish player...

    MATEUSZ MOZDZEN (Lech Poznan) vs Manchester City - Europa League 2010/2011, Group Stage:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L_I5IRsrOSU
     
  23. Rebajlo

    Rebajlo Mentor

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  24. Europe

    Europe Mentor

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    Nice goal. I watched the longer tribute to Brady,which was good. It's good to watch all the UK and Irish players back then. It's such a contrast to what we see today.That is what I was expecting to see when I started watching soccer,but I got a rude awakening.How come people talk about the long ball being played for years in England? That didn't look like long ball to me. It looked like a lot of nice passing and dribbling.
     
  25. Rebajlo

    Rebajlo Mentor

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    Europe - The much-discussed "English long ball era"is a bit of a misnomer.It's supposed"pioneer" was Graham Taylor, who managed Watford between 1977 and 1987 and whose sides employed a more "direct" approach. Mind You, plenty of these "long balls" were crosses slung in by wingers who had done a fair bit of dribbling. Taylor, of course,went on to manage England, which was a disaster culminating in England's failure to qualify for the 1994 World Cup. I always hated Taylor as he promoted blackssuch asLuther Blissett and John Barnes, which helped to set the ugly racial toneof the future.

    Dave Bassett's thuggish Wimbledon sides of the 1980s employed classic long ball tactics, which Bassett famously labelled as "route one football". Another notable exponent of the "style" was the Norwegian national side of the 1990s, under the so-called tactical genius Egil Olsen. The Norwegians pumped seemingly endless long balls towards talltarget mensuch as Jostein Flo and Jan-Age Fjortoft - according to Olsen's logic, this was meant to overcome the Norwegians' technical shortcomings (although he labelled it as playing to their strengths). I recall Fjortoft praising the efficacy of the system during an interview, in which he said something to the effect of "we just cut out all of the stuff in the middle and bring the ball straight to the opponent's area". [​IMG]

    Anyway, most of the "universal English long ball" myth is exactly that - another example of anti-English bias in football "folklore". If English teams were so primitive, why were they cleaning up in theEuropean Cupuntil the Heysel ban?

    Anyway, here's a goal from the "long ball" era:

    GLENN HODDLE (Tottenham Hotspur) vs Watford, First Division, 1983/1984:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=16ZOK3sR9WQ
     

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