Draft

Discussion in 'NFL' started by lumsdenpower, Jan 5, 2006.

  1. Don Wassall

    Don Wassall Administrator Staff Member

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  2. KG2422

    KG2422 Mentor

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    Part of their article said that there have never been any black kickers or punters. I guess they don't know about Reggie Roby. These guys aren't real smart. That's the nicest way I can say it.Edited by: KG2422
     
  3. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Wow...reading that garbage from that site really makes me more devoted to our cause. I am incredibly mad right now...someone should post some pics of Vitali crushing Byrd on that site.
     
  4. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I don't know that what the author is trying to say in that "article" is that there was never a Black kicker or punter:

    "( never Kickers of course NO Black Kickers or Punters ever )"

    ...just sort of a strange, parenthetical floating sentence fragment not really conveying anything, at least not clearly.

    I actually find blackathlete.net sort of cute. Granted I've only read a handful of articles; it barely qualifies as junior high-school journalism. The gross misuse of syntax and grammar is endearing. I don't suppose they succeed at convincing anyone of anything that wasn't already firmly prejudiced.

    Hating that site (and it's authors) is kind of a waste of good hate.
     
  5. White Shogun

    White Shogun Hall of Famer

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    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  6. KG2422

    KG2422 Mentor

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    Nice post. I'm convinced.
     
  7. Quiet Speed

    Quiet Speed Mentor

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    "( never Kickers of course NO Black Kickers or Punters ever )"


    Punter and kicker positions are affirmative action in the NFL for whites, that's what a black caller to a radio show claimed several years ago. His premise was these positions were slotted for whites so there would be a presence of whites in the NFL. I guess that one has been working around for a while.

    I would bet the multi-dimensional hip theory has been percolating for sometime too. It just surfaced in a big way when Tory Holt doubted the pick of Matt Jones on the ESPN draft show last year. He was not sure Matt could shift, swivel, flex or whatever his midsection.
     
  8. Kaptain

    Kaptain Master

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    The reason whites dominate kicking positions (punting included)is because it is the one position that relies on vertually zero subjectivity. Either you can kick the ball far and accurately or you can't. It's a very measurable skill. There is no place for opinion or the interjection of mythical intangibles like "hip swivelness" or "fast-twitch muscle fiber". As such it is the one area in football that is immune to caste system thinking.
     
  9. SteveB

    SteveB Mentor

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    It's funny that this thread discusses lack of "hip flexibility" and kickers at the same time. Anyone who has kicked soccer style will tell you that the power comes from the hip turn during the kicking motion. So the prevailing wisdom is that whites are good with their hips when it comes to kicking, but not good with their hips at any other position on the football field. How logical is that?
     
  10. KG2422

    KG2422 Mentor

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    Flexibility is malleable anyway. I would also say that a flexible groin is more important than hip flexibility. When making cuts, the strength of your outer thigh and buttocks, along with groin flexibility and strength, is what provides quickness (also calves). Mental quickness and the ability to judge the trajectory of the ball when you are receiving it are intangibles that are very important as well. I'm pretty short, but I've caught some deep passes against guys who are taller and can jump higher than me. If you judge the ball better than the db, and can get yourself between him and the ball, you can make the catch. I would say that more White players are good at this than Blacks for the same reason that Whites shoot baskets and rifles better. Couple that ability with a White who has formidable speed, height, and leaping ability, he's going to be better than Blacks who have equal measurables.
     
  11. Don Wassall

    Don Wassall Administrator Staff Member

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    Remember a few months back when the early first round mock drafts for '07 were a third white, a huge proportion for the NFL? Well,some of those white players havesince been demoted. Mel Kiper's latest "Top 25 Big Board" has just 6 white players, which means the white ratio is now under 25% and trending toward its usualoverwhelmingly black nature.


    At least all 6 white players are in the top 12. Here's Mel's latest list:


    1. Brady Quinn, QB, Notre Dame (6-3½, 225) | previous: Same
    Poised, smart and at his best in pressure situations. Quinn threw just one interception in his last eight games.





    2. Joe Thomas, OT, Wisconsin (6-6½, 313) | previous: Same
    Huge, quick and athletic with a long wingspan.





    3. Leon Hall, CB, Michigan (5-11, 193) | previous: Same
    Tough customer who also shows very good anticipation and awareness in coverage. Hall leads the Wolverines with three interceptions.





    4. Gaines Adams, DE, Clemson (6-4½, 260) | previous: Same
    Flashes dominating ability with his athleticism and quickness. Adams leads the Tigers with 10½ sacks and 15½ tackles for loss.





    5. Amobi Okoye, DT, Louisville (6-1½, 298) | previous: Same
    A four-year veteran, and he is only 19 years old. Okoye is quick and explosive and goes all-out on every play. He is not only good at eating up space but also gets good penetration into the backfield. He's second on the Cardinals in both sacks and tackles for loss.





    6. LaRon Landry, DB, LSU (6-1½, 205) | previous: Same
    Four-year starter who has proven to be Mr. Reliable throughout his career. Landry leads LSU with 42 solo tackles.





    7. Quinn Pitcock, DT, Ohio St. (6-3, 297) | previous: Same
    Run-stuffing dynamo who does a great job of clogging the interior.





    8. Adam Carriker, DE, Nebraska (6-6, 298) | previous: Same
    You just don't see many defensive ends carrying 300 pounds who can move as well as Carriker.





    9. Tony Ugoh, OT, Arkansas (6-5, 308) | previous: Same
    Ugoh's stock has been rising all year to the point where he's one of the more intriguing senior prospects in the nation.





    10. Jeff Samardzija, WR, Notre Dame (6-4½, 215) | previous: 11
    Super hands and concentration with outstanding speed-to-size ratio. He caught a touchdown pass in four straight and six of the last seven games.





    11. DeMarcus "Tank" Tyler, DT, NC State (6-2¼, 310) | previous: 12
    Extremely quick and very powerful. A player on the rise, Taylor has been a one-man wrecking crew on the defensive line for the Wolfpack.





    12. Ryan Kalil, C, USC (6-2½, 292) | previous: 13
    His performance during the latter stages of his career has been that of a first- or second-round draft choice.





    13. Turk McBride, DT, Tennessee (6-3, 277) | previous: 14
    McBride is a quality athletic talent with dual versatility for the next level, only adding to his value. Week to week, he's one of the more productive defensive linemen in the nation. McBride is fourth on the team with 64 tackles, including eight tackles for loss and five QB hurries.





    14. LaMarr Woodley, DE, Michigan (6-1½, 269) | previous: 15
    Combination DE/OLB with a hustling approach and disruptive capabilities. Woodley leads Michigan in sacks (11) and tackles for loss (15½).





    15. Dwayne Bowe, WR, LSU (6-2, 217) | previous: 16
    Big and productive, Bowe runs excellent routes and has the toughness to catch the ball in traffic.





    16. Tim Crowder, DE, Texas (6-3¼, 273) | previous: 10
    Consistent and reliable in his career, and he has become more of a playmaker for the Longhorns in 2006.





    17. Levi Brown, OT, Penn St. (6-4½, 325) | previous: Same
    Steady and reliable at protecting the quarterback's blind side.





    18. Marcus McCauley, CB, Fresno St. (6-0½, 200) | previous: Same
    He has the size and speed (4.33 40-yard dash) with outstanding coverage technique.





    19. Anthony Spencer, DE, Purdue (6-2½, 261) | previous: 22
    He has become a much more effective pass-rusher this season for the Boilermakers. The key at the next level will be his athleticism and versatility, because I project he would be an ideal outside linebacker in a 3-4 defense.





    20. Patrick Willis, LB, Mississippi (6-2, 235) | previous: 19
    Tackling machine with great football sense. Willis lead the Rebels with 137 tackles (87 solo).





    21. Daymeion Hughes, CB, California (6-0, 187) | previous: Same
    Big-play cornerback for the Golden Bears. Finished strong in 2005 and it carried over to this season. Hughes has eight interceptions, tied for third in Division I-A.





    22. Troy Smith, QB, Ohio State (6-0, 213) | previous: 20
    A consummate winner, Smith performed at his best on the biggest stages. (See his 3-0 record against Michigan, a bowl win over Notre Dame and road win this season at Texas.) He's a great player who makes those around him better, and he has a great ability to keep plays alive with his mobility. His arm strength is excellent and if he was two or three inches taller, Smith would be talked about as a top-five pick.





    23. Quentin Moses, DE, Georgia (6-4, 254) | previous: Same
    Mature, hardworking and explosive off the edge. Moses is second on the Bulldogs with 10½ tackles for loss.





    24. Ikaika Alama-Francis, DE, Hawaii (6-5, 265) | previous: Unranked
    Alama-Francis didn't play football until his redshirt freshman season at Hawaii. (He was recruited to play basketball.) He's a late-developing standout in Jerry Glanville's defense who has great overall strength to consistently hold up against the run.





    25. Craig Davis, LSU, WR, LSU (6-1¼, 200) | previous: Same
    Possesses outstanding speed (4.35 40-yard dash) to go along with his size. Davis was steady and reliable for most of his career, then took his game to a new level late in the season for the Tigers.
     
  12. white is right

    white is right Hall of Famer

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    They have done surveys of junior high schoolers and caucasian youth generally have stronger thighs than black youth. Punting is pure force and power. I had a neighbour who played youth soccer and was a huge defense prospect in hockey he could punt the ball half the football field because of his size. My brother who had a similar build could do the same.
     

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