2010 Denver Broncos

Discussion in 'Denver Broncos' started by whiteathlete33, Aug 12, 2010.

  1. Colonel_Reb

    Colonel_Reb Hall of Famer

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    Well, he made a boat load of money. His goofy look is probably one of satisfaction with having become a multi-millionaire in a very short period of time. I doubt he cares about much else.
     
  2. mick phrom philly

    mick phrom philly Newbie

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    Today in yahoo I read a sports reporter who said that Tebow's career may be in jeopardy, as not manyNFL suits are pro-Tebow. I hope he's wrong. We all know how different it would be if Tebow were black - despite hisalleged bad throwing mechanics, all we'd hear about is his "upside", and he'd be given years to develop.
     
  3. FootballDad

    FootballDad Hall of Famer

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    The sports reporter is just secretly wishing, as he's always been a Tebow doubter/hater. As for "not many NFL suits are pro-Tebow", well, it only takes one, not a unanimous vote.


    Here is the article in question.Edited by: FootballDad
     
  4. Don Wassall

    Don Wassall Administrator Staff Member

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    Even the affletes turned on Eminem:

    A Broncos player tells CBS 4 Denver's Vic Lombardi that now-former coach Josh McDaniels got into a confrontation with Champ Bailey and D.J. Williams on the practice field Monday. It was McDaniels' final straw. The player called the argument "heated and contentious," and said it had to do with "wind sprints" the day after a game. Williams and McDaniels had a checkered history, as the former coach stripped the veteran linebacker of his captaincy following Williams' arrest in mid-November. Several Broncos players were outwardly supportive of the move to fire McDaniels on Monday. "McD" probably should've waited for a playoff berth or two before pretending to be Bill Belichick.
     
  5. FootballDad

    FootballDad Hall of Famer

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    Is there any question who runs the show on most NFL teams? One you lose support of your affletes, you're done. That is why Jeff Fisher is in trouble, he ticked off some of the bruvas, and now there is hell to pay. How dare McEminem make this underachieving group of dregs actually do some cardio work on the practice field.
     
  6. backrow

    backrow Hall of Famer

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    if Broncos no longer want Tebow, i am sure there's at least a few GMs/coaches that do, i am not worried. he may get Hillisized*, and that's for the best.

    Hillisized: run out of town despite being a superior talent and succeeding elsewhere, also known as Welkerism.
     
  7. whiteathlete33

    whiteathlete33 Hall of Famer

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    Finally the pig is out of Denver. He absolutely destroyed the team and got rid of an incredible talent in Hillis.
     
  8. Colonel_Reb

    Colonel_Reb Hall of Famer

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    This brings up a question I have thought about for some time. Exactly when did this kind of thing become the norm in the NFL? I seem to remember someone posting about this in relationship to some team in the early 70s. Something about how they had to pacify the black players on the team. When did this double standard of treatment become universal? Just curious as to what some of our more seasoned posters think about this.
     
  9. WHITE NOISE

    WHITE NOISE Mentor

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    McD getting fired, I'm LOVIN it!
     
  10. sport historian

    sport historian Master

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    I've seen this for almost 50 years. When a coach "loses" the players, the team goes bad and he is soon fired. The players will say they are glad he's gone. It was like this when pro football was heavily white.
     
  11. white is right

    white is right Hall of Famer

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    It's not just football. In hockey a virtually all White sport if a drill sergeant type loses the locker room he will be fired mid-season. I recall ethnic pandering becoming big around the time when the locker room became a slight majority Black. Ie the 86' Giants. Ie Parcells and his special relationship with LT and to a lesser extent Leonard Marshall. He used to be a drill sergeant with Gary Reasons but was doting on Taylor like he was his illegitimate son. Edited by: white is right
     
  12. Don Wassall

    Don Wassall Administrator Staff Member

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    The pandering to black players began in earnest in the late '60s and early '70s, as part of the ongoing Cultural Marxist revolution to overthrow Western, Christian traditions and values that was greatly intensified at that time. A large segment of blacks were successfully turned into militants at that time, as symbolized by the clenched fist black power salutes of Tommy Smith and John Carlos at the Summer Olympics of 1968. Anyone who wasn't alive then can never fully understand how quickly and thoroughly things changed in the U.S. in that fateful year of 1968. That was also when Whites becamea lot morecareful what they said and did around blacks.

    Growing up in Pittsburgh, I watched how the Steelers changedafter Joe Greene was drafted in 1969. He was "mean" all right, a proud, angry black man with an extremely quick and volatile temper that seemed to always be directed at Whites. Chuck Noll would likely be considered a hero now by CFers given that the Steelers of the '70s started an even number of Whites and blacks, but this "old school" coach knew which way the wind was blowing and had two sets of standards, as detailed in "Three Bricks Shy of a Load," the book about the 1973 Steelers by Roy Blount, Jr., being noticeably more lenient toward black players than white ones, which as best I can tell became standardized NFL behavior at that timeand has continued ever since.

    Black sensibilities, and the ways Whites are "allowed" to react to them, remains central to understanding the U.S. and its entrenched racial problems, even though it's not mentioned openly as much anymore, to the point that some starry-eyed dreamers claimed the election of Obama heralded a "post-racial" age in the U.S. Yeah, right.
     
  13. Colonel_Reb

    Colonel_Reb Hall of Famer

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    Three Bricks Shy of a Load, that is what I was thinking of. Thanks for the input everyone. I was thinking that the racial aspect had to have begun before the Caste System fully kicked in during the '80s. I guess what I was thinking of more than anything is when it became ok to coddle athletes and not demand that they work hard or have them work hard. Most people don't know that NFL practices are non-contact during the season. The lack of real conditioning has to be a reason for the increase in injuries and players taking themselves out of games because they are tired.

    I can understand players getting fed up with a coach who is incompetent or a head case. When I was playing high school football, our head coach lost it in the locker room one Friday afternoon an hour or so before we left for an away game. I don't know what he got so ticked over, but he yelled and kicked the trash can over and stormed off. He usually rode the bus with us, but that day he got our line coach to ride with us and he drove himself to the game, about 30 or so miles away. He didn't say much at all pre-game or during half-time. It was a big conference game and we had a great week of practice and we believed we could upset this team.

    We held in there for a while, but without our (and our coach's) head being in the game, we faded in the second half. Our line coach was also the offensive coordinator but our head coach always called the defense. Strangely, he never played football in high school. He ran track. Anyway, after half-time he quit calling our defense. I remember our MLB calling the defense on his own when I was on the field. It was a *&%$ shame we lost that game. Their students hated us and we almost got into a big fight that night. The next week our head coach offered no explanation, but apologized to us and we started afresh. We actually ended up making the playoffs that season, which was our second year of football and first year in a district. Rightly or wrongly, I still blame that loss on our coach.

    Edited by: Colonel_Reb
     
  14. sport historian

    sport historian Master

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    In the early 70s, I read a book by Bill Glass, the former Cleveland Brown DE who became a full-time evangelist after retiring from football. The book was about declining moral values, but Glass had some things to say about football and race.

    Glass wrote that from around the mid-60s, the coaches would explain why a black was cut or traded to the team's black players. Glass seemed to think this was logical to do and would be temporary. Edited by: sport historian
     
  15. Colonel_Reb

    Colonel_Reb Hall of Famer

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    Interesting stuff, sport historian. I wonder why Glass thought it would be temporary? Maybe he figured the "civil rights" movement would end and things would get back to normal? Strange, but it is good to know some of the mindset from that time.
     
  16. sport historian

    sport historian Master

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    The book by Bill Glass I referred to is titled:

    "Don't blame the game; an answer to super star swingers and a look at what's right with sports."

    The main bad guy in this 1972 book is Joe Namath. Glass' book was slightly controversial at the time. He wrote that "swingers" like Namath were what was wrong, but most things (there is a chapter on race relations) were all right in pro football.

    I just checked the catalog in a local college library (where I read it long ago) and it is listed as available. I will check it out in a few days and give the exact quote by Bill Glass on how black players have to be dealt with circa 1970.Edited by: sport historian
     
  17. FootballDad

    FootballDad Hall of Famer

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    Interesting that he would note this. In a way, he's right. The 1960's "swinger" has been replaced by the strip-club going "rain maker".
     
  18. Liverlips

    Liverlips Hall of Famer

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    At least Joe was having sex with real women and not paying for sex with disease-riddled strippers.

    Why do black men like paying for sex anyway? Do they think it makes them seem like a powerful man who can just buy whatever he wants?
     
  19. Don Wassall

    Don Wassall Administrator Staff Member

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    John Elway takes over as "executive vice president of football operations," which best I can tell indicates that he will be in charge of hiring the new head coach as well as overseeing player personnel.

    We will soon get to see if Elway closely adheres to Caste System orthodoxy or not. Denver, as has been discussedon the board quite a bit,seems to have more enlightened DWFs than most other areas, having embraced Ed McCaffrey and Peyton Hillis, and being in proximity to two college teams that play Whites at the "taboo" positions (Colorado and especially Colorado State).
     
  20. Jack Lambert

    Jack Lambert Hall of Famer

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    Don't forget the Air Force Academy Don. Anyway, I hope Elway isn't a huge caste guy.
     
  21. Highlander

    Highlander Mentor

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    Also, Elway was on the sidelines watching his alma-mater, Stanford, put it to VT. The eyes don't lie. He couldn't be much worse than the last couple of years at Denver have been, Caste-wise, at least.
    Edited by: Highlander
     
  22. backrow

    backrow Hall of Famer

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    at least John already said he will let the coach decide whether Tim will start for them but he also said that if a new coach decides TT shouldn't start and be their QB of the future, then he shouldn't be their coach to begin with, haha.
     
  23. bigunreal

    bigunreal Mentor

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    Elway seems to have some loyalty to Tebow, which is a good thing, of course. However, he isn't exactly the most articulate guy on the planet. He's already made a bit of a fool of himself by repeatedly referring to potential head coach candidate Mike Mullarkey as "Mark" during a press conference.

    But hey, who knows, he's never been one of the odious ex-players turned jock sniffing "journalist," so maybe he'll buck the caste system.
     
  24. TheAnimal

    TheAnimal Guru

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    The rumor currently circulating is Elway is absolutely in love with Tim Tebow, so that part at least looks good.

    Has he ever done anything questionable as a player aside from the token "thanks to so and so(black afflete) for helping me win" stuff they all seem to have to recite? Elway has always struck me as a fairly Conservative kind of guy that didn't find a reason to pander to nonwhites. Correct me if i'm offbase.
     
  25. Don Wassall

    Don Wassall Administrator Staff Member

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    Barf (note -- I slightly changed the spelling of his last name):

    According to the Denver Post, former Falcons and Seahawks coach Jim Moron will likely take over as the Broncos' new defensive coordinator. Moron was in town to interview Monday, and the meeting apparently went well. Moron turned around an abysmal 49ers defense under Steve Mariucci from 1999-2003 before head coaching stints in Atlanta and Seattle. Like head coach John Fox, Moron's background is in the 4-3 scheme, so the Broncos are in for yet another seismic shift on defense. Should Moron land in Denver, Dick Jauron would seem to be the favorite in Philadelphia.
     

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