2010 British Open Championship

Discussion in 'Golf' started by Ben Jefferson, Jul 14, 2010.

  1. bigunreal

    bigunreal Mentor

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    Considering that Ernie Els seems to be the person primarily responsible for him being able to master his golf skills, shouldn't Louis have logically thanked him?
     
  2. Jimmy Chitwood

    Jimmy Chitwood Hall of Famer

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    judging bythe numerousposts on his twitter account, Golf Digest's Dan Jenkins is apparently not a big fan of Oosthuizen ...

    this "boredom" was inspired by the most dominating win at the British Open since "the Golfer Formerly Known as the Great One" won by 8 strokes in 2000. funny, the negrophiles didn't call Kitty Cat's performance boring. what could be the difference? hmm ... [​IMG]Edited by: Jimmy Chitwood
     
  3. Thrashen

    Thrashen Hall of Famer

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    The son of a white South African farmer? What a delightful coincidence. Almost too perfect to actually be real-life events.

    "Thanks for conceiving this magnificent nation in which my family may be brutally tortured, viciously raped, and ruthlessly slaughtered at any given moment, Mr. Mandela!"Â￾

    At least Tiger Woods is too egotistical to concern himself with anything accept his own insatiable gratification.Edited by: Thrashen
     
  4. sport historian

    sport historian Master

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    Dan Jenkins isn't a big fan of Woods.
     
  5. Jimmy Chitwood

    Jimmy Chitwood Hall of Famer

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    you don't say? [​IMG]
     
  6. Don Wassall

    Don Wassall Administrator Staff Member

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    Fact is, South Africa still has many places for Whites with money to live in relative safety, just as there are still many places in Southern California (and the Southwest) where Whites live "normal" lives in spite of the Demographic Revolution. Els, Goosen, Sabatini, Immelman, Schwartzel and the other South African pro golfers still live in South Africa and aren't being murdered or their wives raped.

    I don't expect Oosthuizen or any other White athlete to be a vocal opponent of the Caste System or even to understand it. He played outstanding golf, was unbelievably composed at the age of 27, and showed a friendly and ingratiating personality. We have this debate here periodically, but I don't expect White athletes to be philosopher-kings, or martyrs. It's nothing but a colossal lose-lose situation for them when there is still so little awareness of the Caste System and Whites with racial consciousness have been reduced to a marginalized and demonized few. Edited by: Don Wassall
     
  7. sport historian

    sport historian Master

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    Do a Google searh for "Dan Jenkins, Tiger Woods." At the top you should find a 2-18-10 dated column by Jenkins in Golf Digest titled, "Nice (Not) Knowing You."

    Jenkins writes of trying to get an interview with Woods and being blown off. He compares him unfavorably with Hogan, Palmer, Nicklaus.
     
  8. Jimmy Chitwood

    Jimmy Chitwood Hall of Famer

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    sport historian, i actually mis-read your original comment as referring to Oousthuizen. [​IMG]

    sorry, mate.
     
  9. JReb1

    JReb1 Mentor

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    Last week's Open was more about symbols than anything else: the
    white South African golfer and the black South African caddie
    marching across Swilcan Bridge side by side. Summer 2010 has been a
    coming out party for the new South Africa. When the final putt was
    holed, Rasego, who counseled Oosthuizen on most of the 272 shots he
    played, reached out to give his boss an old-school handshake. Shrek
    (the golfer's nickname, courtesy of the gap between his front teeth)
    turned it into a hug. The caddie, who has known poverty and apartheid,
    wasn't fully ready for it.


    Oosthuizen is full of surprises. In sporting terms, the biggest of
    them was that a golfer who had previously played in only eight majors,
    missing the cut in seven of them, could not only win in his ninth
    major start but also blow away the field.


    And as soon as he was done, there was another surprise. In his
    acceptance speech, at the top of the thank-yous, before he mentioned
    his parents and his wife (Nel-Mare) and the fans, he gave a shout-out
    to Nelson Mandela, the former president who has devoted his life to
    ending apartheid in South Africa. Mandela's 92nd birthday fell on
    British Open Sunday.



    "Louis is not a political person," Rasego said later. "I felt my spine running."


    The champion golfer of the year (the title is courtesy of the Royal
    and Ancient Golf Club) grew up in the rural southern South African
    town of Albertinia, where his father, Piet, has a dairy farm with
    110 head.
    Piet was a good tennis player and so was Louis. But Louis,
    doing his own thing, found his way to the local nine-holer, with its
    sand-and-oil greens. If you want to groove a perfect stroke, learn to
    putt on sand greens. They're slow (as are the greens at St. Andrews)
    but absolutely true.


    "Louis was not very keen for milking, but he did like driving the
    tractors," Piet said on Sunday. It was late afternoon, the cows were
    grazing, and Piet and his wife, Minnie, watched on TV as their son
    played in the British Open with a heady lead. Piet sounded like the
    picture of Afrikaner calm.



    He was asked, "Are you glad Louis chose golf over tennis?"


    "Up to now," the father said, "it has been good."


    Another Afrikaner golfer, Ernie Els, who won the 2002 British Open,
    had an early interest in tennis. Were it not for the Ernie Els
    Foundation, which supports promising junior golfers in South Africa,
    Louis Oosthuizen might have learned to like milking a cow. He would
    have had to do something to make a living. He was done with school at
    18. Louis thanks the Big Easy at every turn, in word and deed.

    Oosthuizen has started a junior golf academy at his home club in South
    Africa.




    Read more:
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